Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · The Wicked Witch comes to...
. . . .

The Wicked Witch comes to theTraverse City Film Festival

Anne Stanton - June 15th, 2006
Movie lovers want to know. Will Act II stand up to last year’s Traverse City Film Festival?
The movie line-up hasn’t been announced yet, but fortunately film festival organizers are building on what worked so well last year.
The festival will expand from four days to six days, July 31-August 6, with about 45 movies in total. That’s 50 percent more movies than last year plus there’ll be midnight shows this time.
Fortunately, ticket prices will stay the same at $7 and Open Space movies are free for the sitting. The outdoor screen will be twice as big as last year. That will make one of the Open Space movies—Wizard of Oz—a tad scary for the wee ones … or wussy adults for that matter.
“Most people have never seen the Wizard of Oz on a movie screen, the way it was intended to be seen,” said Michael Moore, film festival founder and Academy Award winner. “Another one we’ll show is Jurassic Park. Imagine 65-foot dinosaurs on a 65-foot screen. It will look like dinosaurs are in the Open Space.”
Word is still pending on some of the Open Space movies, but confirmed picks include Monty Python and the Holy Grail and Dr. Strangelove. (You aren’t likely to see last year’s Freedom Festival sailboat floating by again, however. The counter-festival, one could say, sank at sea without a proper burial.)
One might argue that nothing could ever match the excitement of the very first festival. If you missed the inaugural event last year, imagine gobs of people waiting in lines at the long-shuttered State Theatre, the opening of which was nearly as exciting as the movies (scores of bone-tired volunteers painted and scrubbed and laid down carpet, area stores contributed just a ton of stuff. It was really a sight to behold).
People saw movies that they’d never get to see here otherwise. People chatted, they checked their movie guides, they begged for tickets of sold-out movies, they stepped in and out of packed restaurants for a bite to eat or a quick drink, and, weirdly, bought lots and lots of shoes between shows, according to shoe store owners.
Moore said he can’t yet announce the full movie line-up until June 23, with tickets going on sale the following Friday, June 30, at 10 a.m.
Moore said he has locked in the Stanley Kubrick retrospective. The film festival is paying tribute to Kubrick, who died suddenly in 1999 just before his last film was released, Eyes Wide Shut with Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman. The festival will screen all 11 Kubrick films, including The Shining, A Clockwork Orange, Full Metal Jacket and 2001: A Space Odyssey.
Attending the Kubrick tribute are his producer and brother-in-law, Jan Harlan, and the stars of his films, Malcolm McDowell and Matthew Modine.
New this year: tickets can be purchased online. The festival is also setting up a box office somewhere in downtown Traverse City. The Film Festival invested $9,000 for its own ticketing system this year (Interlochen Center for the Arts generously sold and processed tickets gratis last year).
Film organizers are also working with restaurants and delis to offer box lunches this year for movie-goers trying to squeeze in a meal between showings. During the Open Space movies, a handful of vendors will also sell food—no specifics yet.
The word on parties is that the festival will host a bash for sponsors on July 16, which includes a film at the Bay Theatre in Suttons Bay, followed by a gathering at the picturesque Ciccone Vineyards.
There will also be a kick-off party and a farewell party (tickets are $25). The opening and closing movies are also $25 apiece.
Once again, a handful of renowned film directors will participate in panel discussions and make personal appearances at their films’ screenings.
Most exciting is this year’s guest director Terry George, a friend of Moore’s who directed Hotel Rwanda.
Free panel discussions are slated for each morning of the festival with entry on a first-come, first-serve basis.
“We’re definitely going to have a Kubrick panel. I personally consider him to be America’s greatest film director,” said Moore, who will moderate the panels or introduce the moderators.
Moore said he is talking about panel ideas with screenwriter Chuck Pfarrer, author Doug Stanton, and Michael Mittelstaedt, who heads the film program at the Interlochen Arts Academy.
“I thought maybe a panel on ratings—the process of how they decide a PG or an R or an MC-17. And a panel on religion and film because I’m hoping to bring in this South African film, Son of Man; a Story of Jesus, but it’s set in modern day Africa. And we’ll just have a discussion of faith in movies, and the whole gamut of ideas. We’ll get a panel of liberal and conservative people to discuss that.”
Meanwhile, the outcome of negotiations with Rotary Charities to buy the State Theatre or to lease it on a long-term basis will be announced soon. The film festival does have firm permission to use the State for this year’s film festival.

Next week: A chat with Michael Moore.
 
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