Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

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Don‘t Panic... The drama of James Kunstler‘s ‘Long Emergency‘ ignores details

Oran Kelley - May 26th, 2005
The excerpt from novelist James Kunstler’s new book, “The Long Emergency” (Express 4/14), is certainly interesting. But unlike letter writer Ann Rogers, I think we ought to hesitate a moment before we plan our whole lives around Mr. Kunstler’s predictions.
If you missed Kunstler’s piece, he claims that petroleum production has already peaked, that supplies will be well short of demand quite soon, and that the suburban middle class economy that has been built around cheap oil is going to collapse, along with civilization as we know it.
None of these things are too terribly far fetched (though Kunstler’s more particular predictions, like complete social collapse in the South, are more suited to speculative fiction than speculative non-fiction). But most stories of doom have some degree of plausibility to them -- they wouldn’t be very scary otherwise, would they?
The truly disturbing thing about the
Kunstler’s piece though is unintentional: it is the relish with which Kunstler seems to anticipate all the death, destruction, poverty and displacement he predicts.
His “Long Emergency” essay, like his previous “Geography of Nowhere” book, is strongly marked by hate -- a hate that sometimes echoes Hitler writing on the same subjects (architecture, the depravity of modern life, the looked-forward-to day of reckoning, etc.). Everyone in the anti-modernist, anti-technological wing of the environmental movement ought to read the second section of the “Causes of Collapse” chapter in Mein Kampf -- the parallels between Hitler’s thinking and that of left environmentalists today is cause for reflection.
I don’t think Kunstler is a little Hitler, but I do think he needs to give a thought to whom he sounds like and think seriously about whether he really hates white upper middle-class folks enough to cheer while they starve in their remote gated communities. And I think Kunstler and those who agree with him ought to realize that many of their obsessions -- land for farming, the alienation of urban life, the quest for purity, the evils of economic globalization and the money economy -- are not just of our time: they have a long and not always pleasant legacy in Western history.
And Kunstler’s readers ought to wonder whether a lot of his predictions aren’t just wishful thinking. Does he really think oil supplies are going to fall so fast that the rich won’t be able to make adjustments? Does he really think oil supplies will follow a bell curve pattern when the bell curve really applies to populations, not to single measures taken over time (like oil supplies) and when there are very good arguments that oil supplies DO NOT conform to a bell curve? Does he think that it will be impossible to rebuild hub/spoke transportation infrastructure in the next twenty years when it only took 20 years (circa 1950 to circa 1970) to go from hub/spoke to ringroad sprawl?
But one gets the feeling that Kunstler is not a writer terribly interested in details when they get in the way of drama.
Of course oil supplies are running low, and of course as we exhaust the finite reserves of oil, current supplies will begin to fall, but what’s the point of dragging the “bell curve” into it except to impress the unknowing with a sense of inevitability and predictability. In fact, we can’t predict the details of the decline in oil supplies. It’ll happen--maybe quickly, maybe slowly, we don’t know--or at least we don’t know without an awful lot of careful study, which Kunstler’s essay shows little evidence of.
We should remember that the “great changes” in our economy and society that Kunstler now predicts will happen by 2020, he predicted for 2010 just a few years ago in “The Geography of Nowhere.” That date now being uncomfortably close, catastrophe has been deferred for another decade by our author. I’m glad to see Kunstler is capable of some mercy.
Indeed, “sleepwalking is not an option” and neither is sleepreading. There are much better sources for information about scientific crises than novelists. So if we want to get scared or get working, let’s put down our Crichton and our Kunstler and read some current science.

 
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