Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

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Don‘t Panic... The drama of James Kunstler‘s ‘Long Emergency‘ ignores details

Oran Kelley - May 26th, 2005
The excerpt from novelist James Kunstler’s new book, “The Long Emergency” (Express 4/14), is certainly interesting. But unlike letter writer Ann Rogers, I think we ought to hesitate a moment before we plan our whole lives around Mr. Kunstler’s predictions.
If you missed Kunstler’s piece, he claims that petroleum production has already peaked, that supplies will be well short of demand quite soon, and that the suburban middle class economy that has been built around cheap oil is going to collapse, along with civilization as we know it.
None of these things are too terribly far fetched (though Kunstler’s more particular predictions, like complete social collapse in the South, are more suited to speculative fiction than speculative non-fiction). But most stories of doom have some degree of plausibility to them -- they wouldn’t be very scary otherwise, would they?
The truly disturbing thing about the
Kunstler’s piece though is unintentional: it is the relish with which Kunstler seems to anticipate all the death, destruction, poverty and displacement he predicts.
His “Long Emergency” essay, like his previous “Geography of Nowhere” book, is strongly marked by hate -- a hate that sometimes echoes Hitler writing on the same subjects (architecture, the depravity of modern life, the looked-forward-to day of reckoning, etc.). Everyone in the anti-modernist, anti-technological wing of the environmental movement ought to read the second section of the “Causes of Collapse” chapter in Mein Kampf -- the parallels between Hitler’s thinking and that of left environmentalists today is cause for reflection.
I don’t think Kunstler is a little Hitler, but I do think he needs to give a thought to whom he sounds like and think seriously about whether he really hates white upper middle-class folks enough to cheer while they starve in their remote gated communities. And I think Kunstler and those who agree with him ought to realize that many of their obsessions -- land for farming, the alienation of urban life, the quest for purity, the evils of economic globalization and the money economy -- are not just of our time: they have a long and not always pleasant legacy in Western history.
And Kunstler’s readers ought to wonder whether a lot of his predictions aren’t just wishful thinking. Does he really think oil supplies are going to fall so fast that the rich won’t be able to make adjustments? Does he really think oil supplies will follow a bell curve pattern when the bell curve really applies to populations, not to single measures taken over time (like oil supplies) and when there are very good arguments that oil supplies DO NOT conform to a bell curve? Does he think that it will be impossible to rebuild hub/spoke transportation infrastructure in the next twenty years when it only took 20 years (circa 1950 to circa 1970) to go from hub/spoke to ringroad sprawl?
But one gets the feeling that Kunstler is not a writer terribly interested in details when they get in the way of drama.
Of course oil supplies are running low, and of course as we exhaust the finite reserves of oil, current supplies will begin to fall, but what’s the point of dragging the “bell curve” into it except to impress the unknowing with a sense of inevitability and predictability. In fact, we can’t predict the details of the decline in oil supplies. It’ll happen--maybe quickly, maybe slowly, we don’t know--or at least we don’t know without an awful lot of careful study, which Kunstler’s essay shows little evidence of.
We should remember that the “great changes” in our economy and society that Kunstler now predicts will happen by 2020, he predicted for 2010 just a few years ago in “The Geography of Nowhere.” That date now being uncomfortably close, catastrophe has been deferred for another decade by our author. I’m glad to see Kunstler is capable of some mercy.
Indeed, “sleepwalking is not an option” and neither is sleepreading. There are much better sources for information about scientific crises than novelists. So if we want to get scared or get working, let’s put down our Crichton and our Kunstler and read some current science.

 
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