Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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4Play

Ross Boissoneau - August 25th, 2005
Carole King - The Living Room Tour - Rodkingale/Concord/Hear
It’s too late? Apparently not. How else to explain the continuing appeal of the woman who personified the singer/songwriter with “I Feel The Earth Move,” “Tapestry,” “You’ve Got A Friend” and so many other songs in the 60s and 70s? On this live 2-CD set, King revisits a number of her hits, supported by her piano, occasional guitar and bass, and on “Where You Lead I Will Follow” by daughter Louise Goffin. Sometimes her voice gets a bit ragged, as on “Jazzman,” and sometimes you miss a full band, as on “Smackwater Jack.” But then, the premise of the album is as the title suggests, an intimate acoustic performance for friends. And in that it’s inordinately successful.

Jim Brickman - Grace - Windham Hill
Popular pianist Brickman enlists a couple ringers, er, singers, in this set of sacred music. Ginny Owens and Brickman breathe some new life into “Amazing Grace,” while the string section Brickman uses makes “Crown Him With Many Crowns” a joy. “Ave Maria” is typically overwrought, while Brickman gives “How Great Thou Art” a grace it hardly deserves, and “Joyful” is an expressive take on “Ode to Joy.” However, it’s probably the concluding “Hear Me (Tears Into Wine)” that will make fans stand up and take notice, what with Michael Bolton proving yet again that, love him or hate him, when it comes to soaring MOR ballads, he’s the king of the hill. With its high points and clinkers, instrumentals and vocals, “Grace” is pretty much all over the place.

Fripp & Eno - The Equatorial Stars - Opal
Here it is 30 years later and we’ve finally got the follow-up to “No Pussyfooting” and “Evening Star,” the groundbreaking electronic ambient explorations by King Crimson guitarist Robert Fripp and ex-Roxy Music keyboardist Brian Eno. They’ve obviously had plenty of time to perfect their tape looping and frippertronics, and it’s all on display in these seven soundscapes. The program falls somewhere between those two earlier recordings, with much
of the beauty of “Evening Star” intact, yet with some of the edge of “No Pussyfooting.” The latter is most apparent on “Lupus” where scratchy drones give way to slow-moving washes and gentle glissandos. The sounds range from nearly-recognizable guitars to bells and violins, all produced by the two sonic pioneers.

Various Artists - Visions of An Inner Mounting Apocalypse - Tone Center
This tribute to the Mahavishnu Orchestra brings together a who’s who of fusion guitarists paying homage to John McGlaughlin and one of the seminal bands of the genre. Steve Lukather of Toto opens with a blazing “Birds of Fire,” the title track from Mahavishnu’s second album, and things only get hotter from there with Mike Stern, Steve Morse, Frank Gambale, Greg Howe, and others. They’re supported by an ultra-tight band of Vinnie Colaiuta on drums, Kai Eckhardt on bass, Mitchell Forman on keyboards, project coordinator Jeff Richman on guitar, even original Mahavishnu violinist Jerry Goodman on a few tracks. Anyone who was into the fusion scene of the ‘70s and ‘80s will enjoy this bracing set. This is just one of four such projects from Tone Center, the others featuring the music of Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and Weather Report.
 
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