Letters

Letters 8-18-2014

The Climate Clarified

Climate change isn’t an easy subject. A class I’m taking compared it to medicine in a way that was helpful for me: Climate scientists are like planetary physicians. Our understanding of medicine is incomplete, but what we know is useful...

Beware Non-Locally Grown

The article “Farm Fresh?” couldn’t be any more true than exactly stated. As an avid shopper at the local farm markets I want to know “exactly” what I am buying, from GMO free to organic or not organic, sprayed or not sprayed and with what...

Media Bias Must End

I wish to thank Joel Weberman for his letter “Seeking Balanced Israel Coverage.” The pro-Palestinian bias includes TV news coverage...

Proud of My President

The world is a mess. According to many conservative voices, it would not be in such a mess if Obama was not the president. I am finally understanding that the problem with our president is that he is too thoughtful, too rational, too realistic, too inclined to see things differently and change his mind, too compassionate to be the leader of a free world...

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Eye in the Sky: Hubble Space Telescope Exhibit Provides a Glimpse of the Universe

Robert Downes - October 9th, 2003
Not since Galileo turned his telescope towards the heavens in 1610 has any event so changed our understanding of the universe as the deployment of the Hubble Space Telescope.
And you can see for yourself with a new exhibition of space photography at the Dennos Museum Center entitled, “Heavens Above: Photographs of the Universe from the Hubble Space Telescope,“ which runs Sept. 28 – Feb. 29, 2004.
Orbiting 375 miles above the Earth, the Hubble Space Telescope is unlocking the secrets of the universe through its observations of more than 25,000 stars, nebula, planets and galaxies -- and that‘s just the beginning. With pin-point precision, powerful optics, and state-of-the-art instruments it produces spectacular views that cannot be obtained from ground-based telescopes which are hampered by the earth‘s atmosphere. As of March, 2000, it had taken more than 330,000 photos. Circling the globe every 97 minutes, it has traveled more than 1.5 billion miles over the past 13 years -- the distance from Earth to Uranus.
Designed in the ‘70s and launched in 1990 at a cost of $1.5 billion, the Hubble was placed in orbit by the space shuttle Discovery. NASA scientists were heart-broken to learn, however, that there was a spherical aberration on the telescope‘s primary mirror, which wrecked its vision. That initial failure sent political shock waves through the space agency as NASA became a target for a number of politicians.
Over the next few years, however, space shuttle astronauts installed corrective optics and gyroscopes on the Hubble in a series of dramatic missions which got the telescope working properly. Shuttle servicing missions are ongoing and planned into the future in order to install new sensing and visual technology to help scientists in their exploration of the universe.
The scope was named after American astronomer Edwin P. Hubble, who was a staff member (from 1919) at Mt. Wilson Observatory. Hubble used Mt. Wilson‘s 100-inch telescope to discover that there are large-scale galaxies beyond the Milky Way and that they are distributed almost uniformly in all directions. In what is now known as Hubble‘s Law, he was the first to offer evidence supporting the theory of the expanding universe.
The Dennos exhibit features 30 breathtaking, high-resolution color transparencies of planets, galaxies, star clusters and other deep-space phenomena. The exhibition was organized by the NASA Space Telescope Science Institute and the Midland Center for the Arts.
The Hubble exhibit kicks off a season of exceptional photography at the Dennos. Future shows will include an exhibition on the history of photography, including what it believed to be the first photograph ever created. On November 13, rock music photographer Tom Wright will host the world premiere of his exhibition, “An Assortment of Used Rock and Roll and Cultural Photography,“ which will also feature musical artifacts from the hey-day the ‘60s and ‘70s.
The Dennos Museum Center is open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays 1-5 p.m. Admission is $4 adults, $2 for children and free to museum members.
 
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