Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Eye in the Sky: Hubble Space...
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Eye in the Sky: Hubble Space Telescope Exhibit Provides a Glimpse of the Universe

Robert Downes - October 9th, 2003
Not since Galileo turned his telescope towards the heavens in 1610 has any event so changed our understanding of the universe as the deployment of the Hubble Space Telescope.
And you can see for yourself with a new exhibition of space photography at the Dennos Museum Center entitled, “Heavens Above: Photographs of the Universe from the Hubble Space Telescope,“ which runs Sept. 28 – Feb. 29, 2004.
Orbiting 375 miles above the Earth, the Hubble Space Telescope is unlocking the secrets of the universe through its observations of more than 25,000 stars, nebula, planets and galaxies -- and that‘s just the beginning. With pin-point precision, powerful optics, and state-of-the-art instruments it produces spectacular views that cannot be obtained from ground-based telescopes which are hampered by the earth‘s atmosphere. As of March, 2000, it had taken more than 330,000 photos. Circling the globe every 97 minutes, it has traveled more than 1.5 billion miles over the past 13 years -- the distance from Earth to Uranus.
Designed in the ‘70s and launched in 1990 at a cost of $1.5 billion, the Hubble was placed in orbit by the space shuttle Discovery. NASA scientists were heart-broken to learn, however, that there was a spherical aberration on the telescope‘s primary mirror, which wrecked its vision. That initial failure sent political shock waves through the space agency as NASA became a target for a number of politicians.
Over the next few years, however, space shuttle astronauts installed corrective optics and gyroscopes on the Hubble in a series of dramatic missions which got the telescope working properly. Shuttle servicing missions are ongoing and planned into the future in order to install new sensing and visual technology to help scientists in their exploration of the universe.
The scope was named after American astronomer Edwin P. Hubble, who was a staff member (from 1919) at Mt. Wilson Observatory. Hubble used Mt. Wilson‘s 100-inch telescope to discover that there are large-scale galaxies beyond the Milky Way and that they are distributed almost uniformly in all directions. In what is now known as Hubble‘s Law, he was the first to offer evidence supporting the theory of the expanding universe.
The Dennos exhibit features 30 breathtaking, high-resolution color transparencies of planets, galaxies, star clusters and other deep-space phenomena. The exhibition was organized by the NASA Space Telescope Science Institute and the Midland Center for the Arts.
The Hubble exhibit kicks off a season of exceptional photography at the Dennos. Future shows will include an exhibition on the history of photography, including what it believed to be the first photograph ever created. On November 13, rock music photographer Tom Wright will host the world premiere of his exhibition, “An Assortment of Used Rock and Roll and Cultural Photography,“ which will also feature musical artifacts from the hey-day the ‘60s and ‘70s.
The Dennos Museum Center is open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays 1-5 p.m. Admission is $4 adults, $2 for children and free to museum members.
 
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