Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Eye in the Sky: Hubble Space...
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Eye in the Sky: Hubble Space Telescope Exhibit Provides a Glimpse of the Universe

Robert Downes - October 9th, 2003
Not since Galileo turned his telescope towards the heavens in 1610 has any event so changed our understanding of the universe as the deployment of the Hubble Space Telescope.
And you can see for yourself with a new exhibition of space photography at the Dennos Museum Center entitled, “Heavens Above: Photographs of the Universe from the Hubble Space Telescope,“ which runs Sept. 28 – Feb. 29, 2004.
Orbiting 375 miles above the Earth, the Hubble Space Telescope is unlocking the secrets of the universe through its observations of more than 25,000 stars, nebula, planets and galaxies -- and that‘s just the beginning. With pin-point precision, powerful optics, and state-of-the-art instruments it produces spectacular views that cannot be obtained from ground-based telescopes which are hampered by the earth‘s atmosphere. As of March, 2000, it had taken more than 330,000 photos. Circling the globe every 97 minutes, it has traveled more than 1.5 billion miles over the past 13 years -- the distance from Earth to Uranus.
Designed in the ‘70s and launched in 1990 at a cost of $1.5 billion, the Hubble was placed in orbit by the space shuttle Discovery. NASA scientists were heart-broken to learn, however, that there was a spherical aberration on the telescope‘s primary mirror, which wrecked its vision. That initial failure sent political shock waves through the space agency as NASA became a target for a number of politicians.
Over the next few years, however, space shuttle astronauts installed corrective optics and gyroscopes on the Hubble in a series of dramatic missions which got the telescope working properly. Shuttle servicing missions are ongoing and planned into the future in order to install new sensing and visual technology to help scientists in their exploration of the universe.
The scope was named after American astronomer Edwin P. Hubble, who was a staff member (from 1919) at Mt. Wilson Observatory. Hubble used Mt. Wilson‘s 100-inch telescope to discover that there are large-scale galaxies beyond the Milky Way and that they are distributed almost uniformly in all directions. In what is now known as Hubble‘s Law, he was the first to offer evidence supporting the theory of the expanding universe.
The Dennos exhibit features 30 breathtaking, high-resolution color transparencies of planets, galaxies, star clusters and other deep-space phenomena. The exhibition was organized by the NASA Space Telescope Science Institute and the Midland Center for the Arts.
The Hubble exhibit kicks off a season of exceptional photography at the Dennos. Future shows will include an exhibition on the history of photography, including what it believed to be the first photograph ever created. On November 13, rock music photographer Tom Wright will host the world premiere of his exhibition, “An Assortment of Used Rock and Roll and Cultural Photography,“ which will also feature musical artifacts from the hey-day the ‘60s and ‘70s.
The Dennos Museum Center is open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays 1-5 p.m. Admission is $4 adults, $2 for children and free to museum members.
 
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