Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

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World Cup and Other Observations

George Foster - June 29th, 2006
No one should have been surprised.
Compared to expectations, the U.S. performance was the poorest of any team in the World Cup soccer tournament. The Americans meekly scored only two goals in three games - and one was by an opponent into the wrong net. Talk about not having a chance, the U.S. never held the lead in any game.
When tiny Ghana beat the Americans, it brought home (still again) how far behind the rest of the planet we are when it comes to playing the world’s most popular sport - soccer.
After upsetting the Americans, the Cinderella Ghana squad has earned a spot in the second round of 16 teams. For a country that has little to be proud of internationally, you can bet there is bedlam in this African country about the size of Oregon with a population of only 22 million. Reportedly, Ghanaians were still recovering from their shocking win over the Czech Republic when the second eruption occurred - a toppling of the mighty U.S.A.
Instead of criticizing our U.S. soccer team, Americans should be asking the question, “What is wrong with Ghana and other unassuming nations whipping us in major sporting events?”
Being the richest country on top of one of the most populous nations, we Americans always expect to succeed, if not be the best. I, for one, like being the underdog for a change. It is nice to reaffirm that we can learn something from the rest of the world.

Speaking of international sports, northern Michigan’s own Phil Thiel just returned from playing professional rugby for a team just outside of Gloucester, England. The 21-year old former Traverse City West standout football player has accomplished the unthinkable for an American - holding his own against some of the top rugby players in the world.
Thiel is well known in area rugby circles as he came of age through the development system of the Traverse City Blues Rugby Football Club and was the team’s most valuable player last year. For more information on the local rugby scene, call 231-342-9136 or log-on to www.tcrugby.com.

Don’t get too excited about the streaking Detroit Tigers just yet.
Despite a surprising start that finds the Tigers with the best record in the league much of the season, they have yet to prove they can beat good teams. The Yankees, Red Sox, and White Sox have beaten the Tigers ten of thirteen games so far this year.
The best news is that Detroit’s young pitching staff could sustain this team for another decade if they live up to their performances so far through the first week in July. Adding crafty veteran pitcher Kenny Rogers for the short term to the strong, young arms already stockpiled was a stroke of genius by Tigers management.

I look forward to attending my first minor league baseball game sometime in the next couple of weeks. Congratulations to the Traverse City Beach Bums who seem to be a big hit in their inaugural season. The last time I checked, the team is actually playing good baseball - thriving in second place in their league.
I did take a tour of the Beach Bum’s field just before the season began. One thing was never in doubt - Wuerfel Park is a fantastic place to watch a baseball game. Ordering tickets early is recommended. Call 231-943-0100 or log-on to www.traversecitybeachbums.com.

 
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