Letters

Letters 08-29-2016

Religious Bigotry President Obama has been roundly criticized for his apparent unwillingness to use the term “radical Islamic terrorism.” His critics seem to suggest that through the mere use of that terminology, the defeat of ISIS would be assured...

TC DDA: Focus On Your Mission What on earth is the Traverse City DDA thinking? Purchasing land around (not within) its TIF boundaries and then offering it at a discount to developers? That is not its mission. Sadly enough, it is already falling down on the job regarding what is its mission. Crosswalks are deteriorating all around downtown, trees aren’t trimmed, sidewalks are uneven. Why can’t the DDA do a better job of maintaining what it already has? And still no public restrooms downtown, despite all the tax dollars captured since 1997. What a joke...

European-Americans Are Boring “20 Fascinating People” in northern Michigan -- and every single one is European-American? Sorry, but this is journalistically incorrect. It’s easy for editors to assign and reporters to write stories about people who are already within their personal and professional networks. It’s harder to dig up stuff about people you don’t know and have never met. Harder is better...

Be Aware Of Lawsuit While most non-Indians were sleep walking, local Odawa leaders filed a lawsuit seeking to potentially have most of Emmet County and part of Charlevoix County declared within their reservation and thus under their jurisdiction. This assertion of jurisdiction is embedded in their recently constructed constitution as documentation of their intent...

More Parking Headaches I have another comment to make about downtown TC parking following Pat Sullivan’s recent article. My hubby and I parked in a handicap spot (with a meter) behind Mackinaw Brew Pub for lunch. The handicap spot happens to be 8-10 spaces away from the payment center. Now isn’t that interesting...

Demand Change At Women’s Resource Center Change is needed for the Women’s Resource Center for the Grand Traverse Area (WRCGT). As Patrick Sullivan pointed out in his article, former employees and supporters don’t like the direction WRCGT has taken. As former employees, we are downright terrified at the direction Juliette Schultz and Ralph Soffredine have led the organization...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Ian Anderson Unplugged
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Ian Anderson Unplugged

Ross Boissoneau - July 13th, 2006
A rock band joining forces with an orchestra isn’t so far-fetched. Groups like Emerson, Lake and Palmer, the Moody Blues and Yes have paired their brand of symphonic rock with orchestras over the years.
But Jethro Tull frontman Ian Anderson has gone them one better. He’s ditched Tull for the moment in favor of a “more flexible” rock band that works within a symphony orchestra, performing a set of Tull and Anderson solo favorites, along with a smattering of classical tunes. Anderson hasn’t quit Tull by any means, but relishes the chance to do something different.
“It’s part of the luxury I can afford,” said Anderson of this tour, which finds
him and his hand-picked group perform-ing alongside the Traverse Symphony Orchestra at Interlochen on Wednesday July 19. “I can dabble at this, dabble
at that.”

SOMETHING NEW
Whether you call it dabbling or not, there’s no doubt that it’s not exactly what fans who grew up on “Aqualung,” “Locomotive Breath” or “Thick As A Brick” would expect. Anderson’s flute playing was always a focal point of the Tull concerts, but here it takes center stage. Yes, he’ll still sing a song or two, and strum his acoustic guitar, but the show is billed as rock’s foremost flute player performing with a symphony orchestra.
Anderson said for him the performance feels quite natural.
“My background is as an acoustic musician,” Anderson says. “I was never deeply infatuated with loud electric guitar. Acoustic blues, jazz, classical – that’s what I really preferred. Flute and rock are very unseemly bedmates.
“The orchestra is a bunch of unplugged guys like me. We try to find a common musical denominator with the band. It (the band) is not the Tull guys but other musicians, guys from jazz or classical background who maybe have a different approach.”
That “different approach” allows Anderson the freedom to re-arrange tunes like “Bouree’,” “Thick As A Brick,” “Songs From The Wood,” and yes, even “Aqualung.” The set list changes slightly from performance to performance, as Anderson and his band rehearse with a different orchestra for most every show. “It’s like doing two or three shows,” says Anderson of the four to six hour rehearsals prior to the concerts. “We hope to squeeze everything into the rehearsal,” he says.
 Anderson says such rehearsals are necessary for orchestral players who generally aren’t used to playing rock music, as well as for him and his band to adapt to the styles and abilities of the various symphonies. “I’m asking them to make such a big crossover step. It’s hard.”
On the other hand, Anderson owns up to the fact that while he appreciates it, he doesn’t – can’t – play classical music the way it’s written. “For me, it’s impossible. I couldn’t do a Mozart flute concerto. I don’t read music. I wish I could be anywhere half as good as them.
“It’s a mutual respect. There’s mutual support and mutual cynicism,” he said with a laugh.

BEVY OF STYLES
In the nearly 40 years since Jethro Tull came on the musical scene, the band has incorporated a bevy of styles into its performance. Originally an offshoot of the John Evan Big Band, it mixed jazz with blues and folk on its 1968 debut, “This Was.” By the time of the band’s breakout “Aqualung” in 1968, Anderson had seized control. With the help of guitarist Martin Barre and keyboardist Evan, Tull became one of the biggest bands of the ‘70s, with sold-out tours, hit songs like “Living in the Past” and “Bungle in the Jungle” and concept albums like “Thick as a Brick” and “A Passion Play” wowing critics and crowds alike.
As art rock fell from favor in the ‘80s, Tull sharpened its licks, even earning a Grammy for Best Heavy Metal Performance for “Crest of a Knave” in 1987. Meanwhile Anderson was also working on his solo career, first with “A” in 1980, which became a Tull album, then for real with “Walk Into Light” in 1983. He also dabbled (there’s that word again) at fish-farming in Scotland, but decided music was his true calling.
Tickets for the show are available by calling the Interlochen Box Office at
276-7800.
 
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