Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Guster
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Guster

Eric Pokoyoway - July 20th, 2006
Few bands can stay together for more than a decade and still keep creating something different and new.
One of them, however, is Guster. They will be performing at the Interlochen Music Festival, on Tuesday, July 25 along with Ray LaMontagne.
“I just love how our band feels unpredictable right now,” said percussionist Brian Rosenworcel.
Guster has been together for 13 years and released its fifth album June 20, called “Ganging Up On the Sun.” “Ganging Up On the Sun” debuted at number 25 on the Billboard Top 200 charts.
“We have had some very good responses with the new album,” said Joe Pisapia, multi-instrumentalist. “We were in Milwaukee for a show and the crowd was already singing along with the new stuff.”
Pisapia plays several insturments on the new album, including banjo, dulcimer, trumpet and lap steel guitar. He also served has a producer for half of the songs on the album.
Guster is an alternative band that was originally formed by Ryan Miller, (guitar and vocals), Adam Gardner (guitar and vocals) and Rosenworcel. Pisapia joined the band six years ago after he and his brother toured with Guster for a few months.
“Joe is by far the best musician in the band,” Miller said. “He can play every instrument and has taken our level of musicianship up about seven notches.”
The three original band members met in 1991 at college orientation while attending Tuft University in Massachusetts. They debuted their first album, “Parachute,” in 1994.
“Parachute,” and their second album “Goldfly” featured percussionist Rosenworcel nicknamed by Guster fans as the “Thunder God” for playing many of his shows with his bare hands and showing off his expertise with bongos, cymbals and other percussion instrument.
“We have been moving away from the bongos for the past couple of years now. Some die-hard Guster fans might not like it, it’s kind of a catch-22, but it gives us a wider range to work with and can be even more creative,” Pisapia, said.
Guster has always been a band willing to try new things without losing its fan base; however, they have been criticized in the rock media as becoming radio friendly.
“We try to be a little of both [radio friendly and independent], but I think that we go very deep with this album,” Pisapia said. “It’s like going from painting with eight colors, to using 16 and being able to modify those a little.”
Guster has found success by creating melodies and harmonies that are unlike mainstream music.
“I think when we switched from just ‘the guitars and percussion’ shtick to using whatever was in front of us, we ended up sounding more like the bands we were listening to.” “Rosenworcel said.
“We have a song ‘Ruby Falls,’ that is seven minutes long, channeling our Pink Floyd spirit,” Pisapia said.
Some other influences that can be heard on this album are the Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, the Beatles and Tom Petty.
“The word ‘classic’ was used a lot throughout recording as a goal for the sound of this album,” Gardner said.
In the last 13 years, Guster has been able to create a huge following, especially along the East coast and among the college crowd. Pisapia said that it’s important for any band to stay new and original.
“Making music is like playing with Legos -- you’re creating stuff and constently progessing,” Pisapia said. “That’s why I like creating music because you’re always trying to perfect it.”
 
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