Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Johnny Winter
. . . .

Johnny Winter

Mark Waggener - July 27th, 2006
On Thursday July 27, storied guitar hero Johnny Winter makes a rare appearance in Northern Michigan. This is an opportunity for music fans throughout the region to pay homage to one of the most prolific blues guitar players in modern times.
Born in Beaumont Texas in 1944, John Dawson Winter III grew up surrounded by cajun, country & blues music. He organized his first band called Johnny and the Jammers when he was just 14 years old. His brother Edgar played piano in the group and it wasn’t long before they became a local phenomenon.
By age 15 Winter released his first single called “School Day Blues.” Since then Johnny Winter has gone on to enjoy a career that spans 40 years and has solidified his place in music history. What sets him apart is the distinctive voice, the wizard-like guitar style and the passionate fury he displays as an accomplished slide player.
Between 1968 and 1980 he recorded 15 albums that defined the blues-rock form that made him a household name. He has shared the stage with Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Muddy Waters, and B.B. King to name a few. With the commercial success of tunes like “Rock ’N’ Roll Hoochie Koo” it is obvious that he has not only inspired blues artists abroad, but rock players as well.
In the midst of a busy concert schedule I was fortunate enough to get an interview from the legend himself.

NE: There seems to be a resurgence in the blues scene, how has it changed, if at all since you started.
Winter: It’s not as traditional today, not as rootsy.

NE: How does it feel to be touring again and what do you do to stay fit?
Winter: Fantastic! First I stopped drinking and then I started eating right. Being on the road keeps me active and in much better shape.

NE: Who is managing your career?
Winter: My second guitarist Paul Nelson, and he is doing a fine job as well as being one hell of a guitar player.

NE: Are you being well received by a new breed of fans?
Winter: Yes! Recently I have noticed a growing number of younger fans coming to my shows.

NE: Who were some of your biggest influences growing up and who continues to inspire you today?
Winter: Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters, Jimmy Reed, Lightn’in Hopkins, Clarence Gatemouth Brown and of course T Bone Walker. I still listen to them today.

NE: What are your memories of working with Muddy Waters and other blues greats?
Winter: Working with Muddy was one of the highlights of my career. I did four records with him, three of which won Grammy’s. I also enjoyed working with Sonny Terry.

NE: What was it like playing Woodstock in ’69?
Winter: I don’t remember that much about it except it was wet and muddy. I never thought it would be as historic as it now is at that time.

NE: Are you doing any producing these days?
Winter: I co-produced my last Grammy nominated CD “I’m A Bluesman” on Virgin/EMI.

NE: What kind of equipment are you using on the road?
Winter: Musicman amp with 4x10’s, a boss chorus pedal and my Laser guitar and Firebird for slide.

NE: Where do you draw all of that emotion from when you strap on the guitar.
Winter: It just comes out of me. You just have to have that feeling.

NE: How does it feel to have made such an enormous impact on so many people’s lives through your music?
Winter: Feels great! Real great.

NE: How has the internet and file sharing affected your career?
Winter: It has made my music
more accessible to more people,
especially through my web site
www.johnnywinter.net.

Mark your calendar, Thursday July 27, 7:30 p.m. The Petoskey Blues Festival at The Emmet County Fairgrounds community building will feature a one - two punch of distinguished blues masters. Opening the show is Larry McCray who is a superb guitarist and singer enjoying a stellar career, followed by Johnny Winter. Paul Koch of Ram Productions plans to make this blues extravaganza an annual event.
Tickets can be purchased for $25 online @ www.frankenmuthfestivals.com, 800-386-3378, or at Borders Book Store in Traverse City 231- 933-0412, Hops N’ Schnapps South in Gaylord 989-344-1228, Bridge Street Book Shop in Charlevoix 231-547-7323, Grain Train in Petoskey 231-347-2381, Between The Covers in Harbor Springs 231-526-6658, Island Book Store in Mackinaw City
906-847-6202, Dharma Music in Grayling 989-344-1228 & Concert Connection in Alpena 989-356-4900.
 
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