Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Catch a Reinbow
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Catch a Reinbow

Danielle Horvath - August 10th, 2006
The first time Rorie Asplet went horseback riding, he screamed from the parking lot to the doors of the arena. Rorie has cerebral palsy and has spent his life in a wheelchair and had a fear of animals, especially large ones, because he had always come face-to-face with them.
It took a few more attempts before Rorie began feeling the positive effects riding had on his muscles, while also developing a friendship with both the horse and its owner. Rorie, now 21, is now going on his seventh year participating in the Catch A Reinbow therapeutic horseback riding group and his parents are very glad they made that first trip.
“He used to be in pain, his legs are better, he’s grown, he sits up taller,” explained his dad Reggie. “After a night of riding, his legs will be shaking afterwards because it uses different muscles than when he’s in the chair. It stimulates parts of his body that don’t get it any other way, even though he works out at a fitness center four days a week. He’s also become good friends with his horse, which was an added bonus.”

A horse’s walk or gait imitates that of humans, and horses will change their gait to accommodate the rider. For someone in a wheelchair, this may be the closest they’ll ever come to feeling what it’s like to walk. Riding a horse provides a passive stretch for tight muscles, stimulates internal organs and circulation and improves the body’s range of motion.
Studies show riders improve not only physically, but psychologically as well through the connection made between the horse and rider. Often riding increases a handicapped person’s self confidence, responsibility and pride as well as instilling a sense of accomplishment.
Each rider has two people walking on either side of the horse at all times, and the horse is usually led by its owner. Volunteers trailer and transport their horses to the sessions and many have been involved in the program for years.
“It’s really a lot of fun,” said John Yonkers, who has been transporting his two horses from Manistee for the past five years. “My horses enjoy the kids riding them, the whole experience calms them down and the people I’ve met have been awesome. Everyone gets a lot of enjoyment out of this.”
The all-volunteer program serving Antrim, Benzie, Kalkaska, Leelanau and Grand Traverse counties relies on a small group of dedicated, dependable and caring adults and teens. Led by a certified instructor, the program works with specially-selected horses that are gentle, docile, used to being around people and noises, and are not too big or tall. The program has been held at different locations over the past nine years, including indoor arenas donated by horse owners.

“I think it’s a great program, and very important to these kids and the volunteers,” said Diane Kaser, owner of Spring Moon Equestrian Center outside of Beulah. Kaser donates the use of her indoor arena for the six week sessions. The indoor settings provide a less distracting and safer environment, and a more level surface for both horses and volunteers to walk on. “Safety is first, always,” explained instructor Jody Bambas, “and having fun is second.”
Bambas led the group of six riders in an hour-long session that included safety awareness, directing the horse, and learning to use proper commands and gestures. All riders are required to wear helmets and meet medical approval before riding. All volunteers are screened and trained to serve in a variety of roles.
Bambas is currently the only instructor in the area and the program is always looking for more. A fee for the participants is nominal and scholarships may be available. The program survives on networking and word of mouth and financial donations from individuals and organizations.
Anyone interested in finding out more about the Catch A Reinbow program should contact Patty Roth, 4-H Youth Programs, MSU-Extension, Benzie County, (231) 882-0025.

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