Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Roadtrip... The Old Mission...
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Roadtrip... The Old Mission General Store offers an old - time touch

Len Barnes - June 9th, 2005
It was in 1839 when a missionary erected a wigwam on Old Mission Peninsula as part of the first white settlement in the Grand Traverse area.  By 1850, the settlement hosted the region’s first general store as well as the first post office north of Muskegon and south of the Mackinac Straits. During the Civil War the store was moved to its current location in the town of Old Mission, up from the beach. 
Today the center portion of the building remains as the original store with an aura of the distant past. The post office left in March of last year, but owner Jim Richards, 52, still sells .37 cent stamps for .36 cents.
This general store with old wood floors doesn’t sell feed, paint or martinis, but it does sell lots of Cracker Jacks and dried cherries, strawberries and blueberries by the pound along with pistachios and barrels of trail mix. And it has lots of glass jars of soft and hard candy plus pretzels and dried apples.
Richards and his employees sell ice cream cones in three sizes: $2 for marble size, $2.50 for golf ball size and $3 for baseball size in strawberry, cherry, vanilla and chocolate from Country Dairy in New Hart. Richards sells coffee at five cents a cup beside a sign for hot cocoa and plans to make his own root beer. 
A pot-bellied stove sits in the middle of the store, and a sign in the rear advertises fish sandwiches, sloppy joes and Angus Mission burgers with soups listed as chili gumbo, Veisco chili and Tomato Florentine.
We like the 12 year old cheddar cheese from Rudyard, and often buy a pound of it fresh from the refrigerator lopped off by Richards with a large iron hand tool.
Richards tells all who’ll listen about his ancient telephone with cord attached to nothing. He talks and sings into it, gesturing to others about the temperature outside. The phone harkens back to the WW II era when young women operators connected calls via telephone banks and boards.   
Richards was born in Detroit and raised in Berkley.  Initially, he began an acting career, performing on many stages including the Houghton Lake Playhouse. 
Working in California as a cast member of a soap opera, an accident changed Richards’ life. He was standing on a balcony when it gave way and put him in the hospital; he had to leam to walk all over again. He had just met the young woman, Marcy, who was to be his wife.
They were married in the cherry orchard on Old Mission Peninsula which his father had restored in the 1960s.  He bought the general store six years ago.
In the summer the store becomes a magnet for tourists.  Outside the store you’re likely to see a group of Corvette owners standing beside their cars, or a troop of Harley Davidson bikers astride their bikes, getting their pictures taken. 
Henry Ford once visited here during a camping trip to the area with his friends, the Firestones. Ford told the owners that they should put a gas station in front of the store, which didn’t happen, but Richards wants to put a restored gas pump there one day.




 
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