Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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4Play

Ross Boissoneau - July 14th, 2005
If you‚re going to have a tribute to Earth, Wind and
Fire, who better to do it than those directly
associated with the band, along with some special
guests? Original keyboardist Larry Dunn and
multi-instrumentalists  Morris Pleasure and Sheldon
Reynolds, both longtime members, update „September,‰
„Can‚t Hide Love‰ and a host of other familiar fare.
Other EWF staples include Ronnie Laws, who played on
EWF‚s third album, „Last Days and Time,‰ and
contributes sax on „Can‚t Hide Love,‰ and guitarist
Johnny Graham, who recreates his rockin‚ soul solo on
„That‚s the Way of the World.‰ The mildly hip-hopped
versions don‚t necessarily bring a new dimension to
the proceedings; rather, they make you long for the
original. Interesting and engaging, but it needs a bit
of a kick.


Brian Bromberg ˆ Metal (Artistry Music)
Last year, Brian Bromberg had a jazz best-seller in
„Bobblehead,‰ but it‚s a safe bet nothing on „Metal‰
will find its way onto the smooth playlists. That‚s
because this is one of the hardest rocking shred
guitar albums ever, made even more noteworthy by the
fact there‚s not a guitar in sight. Bromberg plays all
the lead lines on his signature piccolo bass, while
filling in under, behind and around with 4-string,
5-string, and tenor basses, with accompaniment from
Joel Taylor on drums and occasionally Dan Siegel on
keys. The opening „Good Morning‰ is indeed a wakeup
call, while „Through The Window‰ continues in that
vein and „Carlos‰ is a winning power ballad. All
instrumental and all muscle, „Metal‰ proves Bromberg‚s
versatility and yes, indeed, his mettle.
 


Hiroshima ˆ Obon (ESL Music)
Japanese worldbeat smooth jazz? Well, yes. Hiroshima
goes further afield on this entirely instrumental
effort than in the past, with enjoyable results.
Matching ambient jazz beats with the likes of koto and
erhu sounds difficult, but the band pulls it off
without a hitch. Melodies come and go, floating atop
the synths of Kimo Cornwell and Dan Kuramoto, who also
plays saxes, flute, and shakuhachi (the notoriously
difficult bamboo flute). The opening „Swiss Ming‰ sets
the tone, but almost every tune contains the elements
that make this group unique. „Atomic Café‰ features
some soul guitar straight out of the 70s, percussion
beats and those crazy Asian instruments, all following
Dan Kuramoto‚s saxy lead lines. The lack of vocals is
actually a plus, as it focuses all attention on the
best songs the group has ever written.

Frances Black ˆ How High The Moon (Koch)
If she‚d eschew the annoying vibrato, Black could take
her place alongside Maire Brennan and others
celebrating Irish and Celtic music. Even with the
quavery voice, Black manages to capture the emotion
and bittersweet melodies that make the genre popular.
The opening „How Sweet The Tune,‰ the following
„Magdalen Laundry,‰ in fact, most every cut contains
the keening emotion and lyrics that define the best
traditional Irish music. But the instrumental
accompaniment is less inclined toward that tradition
than American pop music, with piano, bass, guitar and
strings supporting Black‚s soprano. The title track
features some sax and guitar reminiscent of John
Martyn, while in other places Black brings to mind
Linda Thompon. Not bad company.
 




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