Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Unconditional Healing
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Unconditional Healing

Shawn Smith - April 6th, 2006
Is your family’s disconcerting eye keeping you from quitting your day job and starting that novel? Is the risk of losing your most-favored customer status at the local steakhouse keeping you from going vegetarian?
Put yourself at ease. You’re not alone. Not by a long shot.
“We’re constantly using others to judge the value of our own lives,” says Dr. Jerry Berbaum, a holistic healer and author of *A Sacred Journey: The Awakening.* “We take on roles of what others think we should be.”
The alternative medicine doctor works with individuals to realize their wants in life and recognize the relationships between people and the natural world. Incorporating nutritional analysis, homeopathy, counseling and natural medicines into his practice, Berbaum believes addressing both physical and psychological needs promotes wellness most effectively.
His methods, he says, leads people to break away from limiting social roles, which often can be the root of illness.
“When we get locked into those roles, we don’t like them, but we don’t recognize them either. So we feel stress and fatigue,” the 63-year-old healer says. “I put a big emphasis on getting people to see their self-worth and value and a lot of the emphasis on getting rid of self-judgment.”
Berbaum hosts self-realization workshops periodically at the Center for Conscious Living, 1200 W. 11th Street in the historic building 50, Traverse City. He is a guest of the Yoga for Health Education program.
Berbaum introduces attendees to methods for recognizing the origin of subconscious fears and self-imposed limits. He also teaches an an exercise helpful for releasing emotional stress. “We talk about how the subconscious mind works so we can have some basis of control over it,” he says.

TAKING HIS OWN ADVICE
Approaching his 30th year as a certified chiropractor, Berbaum began to feel the weight of not only twisting necks and aligning spinal columns but also with providing spiritual guidance and alternative health advice.
On the side of his traditional practice, Berbaum was doling out dietary plans and explaining Native American philosophies to his patients. Realizing the stress the double-duty created, he gave up his chiropractic duties to study more holistic healing methods and Native American teachings.
For the past 11 years, Berbaum has studied under an Oklachoctaw Native American elder, who is specialized as an Ojibwa Peace Shield teacher. Peace shield teachers focus on the relationships between individuals and the world at large.
Leaving chiropractic work largely in the past, Berbaum now shares a Whitmore Lake office with a massage therapist, where he does everything from discuss his patients’ lives to answer the phone and arrange appointments.
This untraditional approach may stem from his experiences in chiropractic school, where Berbaum’s professors taught him to keep a distance from his patients.

“I totally do not believe that,” says Berbaum, who usually goes by “Jerry” with his patients. “People hug me on the way out the door. It’s very family-like.”

HOLISTIC PRACTICE
Sometimes going to the doctor’s office and getting a prescription is all anybody wants when affected by illness. But have you ever had the feeling that medicine alone won’t get you out from under the covers?
Antibiotics may not always be the solution, says Berbaum, who advocates supporting the body’s natural defense systems by balancing physical and psychological discrepancies.
For example, he enjoys telling a story about a sick man who visits a doctor, who tells the man he has six months to live.
“They die just on time, right on schedule,” Berbaum says of those patients. “People are very influenced by their doctors.”
The power of a doctor’s influence adds to his belief in taking unique approaches to curing ailments.
“There are so many variables with what kind of healing works for people,” he says. “One variable that myself and others have found, it’s really the emotional side of the picture that can make a tremendous difference.”

Find out more about Dr. Jerry Berbaum, his book and his workshops at http://www.readingup.com.

 
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