Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

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Tales of The City - Derf unveils his vision of America in *The City Collected*

Robert Downes - January 8th, 2004

Long before there were reality TV shows there was the grueling urban humor of Derf, a Cleveland-based cartoonist who slams a weekly slice of irony and grit down on the comics page with his strip, “The City.“
In his new book, “The City Collected,“ Derf offers the best of his strip over the past 14 years, with thoughts on America‘s obsession with body makeovers, trashing the environment, overconsumption and fear of the unknown (to name a few), all drawn in a style of contemporary baroque married to lank desperation.
Derf, whose strip has run in the Northern Express for almost a decade (often to the displeasure of our more staid readers), is featured in nearly 60 independent weeklies across the country. Derf writes the strip from the perspective of a street-roaming everyman, absorbing the foibles of an outrageous world with a sense of world-weary disbelief from across the counter of a coffee bar or in the desolation of a bus stop. While Derf frequently pokes fun at the super-straight patriotic superhero known as White Middle Class Suburban Man, he also takes care to lampoon fashion-addled hipsters, big-hair mall babes and assorted geeks, hard hats, cops, politicians and mentally unbalanced street-persons. He‘s equally comfortable poking fun at the body-piercing crowd or ripping the Bush administration a new one with his scathing political commentary.
Derf writes from the perspective of America‘s soul, best found in the Midwest. He grew up in a small Mayberry-style farm town of Richfield, Ohio, and claims to have attended school with serial killer cannibal Jeffrey Dahmer, who was at least an acquaintance, if not a friend. He profiled the relationship in a comic novella called “My Friend Dahmer,“ a dark view of what goes into a troubled adolescent‘s mind. After dropping out of art school, he did a stint as a garbageman, profiled in another graphic novel entitled, “Trashed.“
“It was an idyllic childhood for which I‘m very grateful,“ he says in a forward to his book, written by Bob Ethington. “My teenage years, after some hideous hormonal transformation, were spent as an ostracized dork, face buried in a comic book, skulking warily through the school to avoid beatings by jock assholes. The stereotypical adolescence for a cartoonist.“
Drawing cartoons for the school paper at Ohio State University, Derf managed to generate hundreds of angry phone calls, letters and threats after one of his strips reamed local football heroes who‘d gotten in trouble with the law. It was the beginning of a career of aggravating those readers who can‘t handle “alternative“ comics. Derf was fired from a small paper in Florida for “general tastelessness“ before launching his career with the alternative press in 1990 through a now-defunct paper called the “Cleveland Edition.“ Even with a more receptive venue, several jittery papers have dumped his strip through the years, and “The City“ has gotten others banned from buildings -- more proof that Derf tells it like it is.
“I don‘t think my stuff is any more outrageous than what you see on cable TV,“ he says. “I think it‘s a puritan hang-up about comic strips. Some people think comix should only be like ‘Hi & Lois‘ and just can‘t get beyond that.“
No one escapes Derf‘s satrical eye, which manages to capture the humanity as well as the absurdity of any given moment in America. Check out his book, “The City Collected,“ $10.95 from SLG Publications, with additional info at www.derfcity.com.
-- Robert Downes
 
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