Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

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Marriage survival tips ( for husbands)

George Foster - January 12th, 2006
How did weddings suddenly become a high-end, growth industry?
In the 1960s and 1970s, most marriage ceremonies I attended consisted of  barefootin’ on the beach and other creative, casual affairs. The newlyweds gratefully received my standard gift of freshly baked, whole-grain bread along with candles, incense, and love beads from others. 
By 2005, though, more than two million weddings were performed in the U.S. with an average price tag of $25,000 each. Just try bringing a gift of homemade bread to one of these costly, highly choreographed events now. 
I, too, was recently engaged, married, honeymooned and settled into living happily ever. Married life is great, but I found little focus of weddings and the aftermath relates to the groom and his needs. If so, wedding ceremonies would last ten minutes and receptions would go into the wee hours of the morning at a nightclub, filled with billiard games, bratwursts, wild music, and sports on wide-screen TVs.
Even our newspaper has devoted this issue to the theme of brides, wives, and women in general  - what they want and how to get it. Yet, who thinks of the husband... until it is too late? It takes two to tango - grooms are human beings, too. 
As a newlywed and recent groom, no one will ever ask me for marriage advice. I’m going to give it anyway. The following is a post-wedding survival list... for husbands. I only wish someone had passed on these suggestions to me.
First, guys - learn to enjoy showering with cucumber-apricot body lotion or honey nectar oils and the like. Old-fashioned bars of soap apparently are not available to married couples. Just remember, there is nothing wrong with smelling like a coconut when leaving the house in the morning. Other married men are simultaneously marching around like one big salad, proudly emanating scents of the many varieties of fruits and vegetables.   
Also, now is the time to discover the joys of diversifying your wardrobe. My approach previously focused on an efficient lifestyle: wearing the same jeans and tee-shirts everyday until a little ripe or worn out. I found this simplified strategy saved on laundry and clothing costs, not to mention valuable time in decision-making. 
My wife’s gifts of clothing and strong suggestions gradually resulted in me seeing the light - I now change my clothes EVERY DAY. I also wear sweaters, clean underwear, and am thinking about learning to iron. My progress has advanced to the point of spending seconds each day coordinating the colors of my wardrobe ensemble. All bachelors out there should begin doing the same.
The satisfaction gained from doing domestic chores was another important lesson for me. Before marriage, I didn’t realize the benefits of scrubbing bathrooms and sweeping floors more than once a decade. Who would have guessed that making the bed each morning could be such a delight?  Despite a previous aversion to washing dishes after each meal, I now enjoy performing this task - almost as much as cleaning bathrooms and making the bed.
My most important suggestion for those being healed of bachelorhood is to find an excellent partner like I did. Despite the adjustments mentioned above, I married Northern Michigan’s sweetest, kindest woman. 
And she definitely deserves a purple heart for attempting to civilize me.


 





 
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