Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

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Marriage survival tips ( for husbands)

George Foster - January 12th, 2006
How did weddings suddenly become a high-end, growth industry?
In the 1960s and 1970s, most marriage ceremonies I attended consisted of  barefootin’ on the beach and other creative, casual affairs. The newlyweds gratefully received my standard gift of freshly baked, whole-grain bread along with candles, incense, and love beads from others. 
By 2005, though, more than two million weddings were performed in the U.S. with an average price tag of $25,000 each. Just try bringing a gift of homemade bread to one of these costly, highly choreographed events now. 
I, too, was recently engaged, married, honeymooned and settled into living happily ever. Married life is great, but I found little focus of weddings and the aftermath relates to the groom and his needs. If so, wedding ceremonies would last ten minutes and receptions would go into the wee hours of the morning at a nightclub, filled with billiard games, bratwursts, wild music, and sports on wide-screen TVs.
Even our newspaper has devoted this issue to the theme of brides, wives, and women in general  - what they want and how to get it. Yet, who thinks of the husband... until it is too late? It takes two to tango - grooms are human beings, too. 
As a newlywed and recent groom, no one will ever ask me for marriage advice. I’m going to give it anyway. The following is a post-wedding survival list... for husbands. I only wish someone had passed on these suggestions to me.
First, guys - learn to enjoy showering with cucumber-apricot body lotion or honey nectar oils and the like. Old-fashioned bars of soap apparently are not available to married couples. Just remember, there is nothing wrong with smelling like a coconut when leaving the house in the morning. Other married men are simultaneously marching around like one big salad, proudly emanating scents of the many varieties of fruits and vegetables.   
Also, now is the time to discover the joys of diversifying your wardrobe. My approach previously focused on an efficient lifestyle: wearing the same jeans and tee-shirts everyday until a little ripe or worn out. I found this simplified strategy saved on laundry and clothing costs, not to mention valuable time in decision-making. 
My wife’s gifts of clothing and strong suggestions gradually resulted in me seeing the light - I now change my clothes EVERY DAY. I also wear sweaters, clean underwear, and am thinking about learning to iron. My progress has advanced to the point of spending seconds each day coordinating the colors of my wardrobe ensemble. All bachelors out there should begin doing the same.
The satisfaction gained from doing domestic chores was another important lesson for me. Before marriage, I didn’t realize the benefits of scrubbing bathrooms and sweeping floors more than once a decade. Who would have guessed that making the bed each morning could be such a delight?  Despite a previous aversion to washing dishes after each meal, I now enjoy performing this task - almost as much as cleaning bathrooms and making the bed.
My most important suggestion for those being healed of bachelorhood is to find an excellent partner like I did. Despite the adjustments mentioned above, I married Northern Michigan’s sweetest, kindest woman. 
And she definitely deserves a purple heart for attempting to civilize me.


 





 
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