Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Do It Yourself Windpower
. . . .

Do It Yourself Windpower

Kerry Krcek - February 23rd, 2006
I have been generating all my electricity for my home and my small wood shop for the last 25 years. I generate my electric power by means of a small wind machine and solar panels (photovoltaic). My home is located on a high ridge in the center of Leelanau County, five-seven miles from Lake Michigan.
I envision that someday we could have small communities around the country collectively owning and operating their own wind machines which could serve the energy needs of 200-1,000 people. People within these communities could be hired to maintain and operate these community-owned sources of energy.
The new technology of wind generators does not require hundreds of them in one confined location. There is no need for wind machines to become visual obstructions or noise hazards.
As you drive on M-72 from Empire to Traverse City, notice the one lone wind machine with 75 foot blades standing only 150 feet above the ground. This machine is hardly obstructing the view, especially compared to the 1,000-foot radio towers nearby. Stop your car and roll down the window; if you’re lucky, you might hear soft whispers coming from this non-polluting, renewable-energy source. (Similar windmills are found on I-75 just outside Mackinaw City.)

200-400 HOMES
Due to innovations in wind technology, machines like the Vesta in Leelanau County are high energy producers and low in noise.The Vesta owned by Traverse Light & Power provides enough electricity to serve 200 homes. This same machine serves 400 homes in Europe.
If we develop State and Federal tax incentives to establish community-owned wind machines, and educate communities on how they can invest in sustainable energy and have ownership of their energy, then costs could in time be reversed.
The utility-owned wind machine orginally cost 200 participating home owners an additional 1.5 cents per kilowatt more than their neighbors who get their power from coal, oil and nuclear plants. Yet, after four years paying this increased price, the utility would own this wind machine outright. Think about that! Your community could own its own power-generating machine in four years with minimal sacrifice in cost. And from then on the cost of electricity would drop significantly.

PLACEMENT
These wind machines can be placed in high energy producing areas that aren’t necessarily going to obstruct our view.
I realize that our visual models are
wind farms in California. These wind farms are outdated by new technology. The California wind farms were from an early period in wind exploration. There were lots of small wind machines, and yes they did make noise. There were hundreds on ridge tops in very close proximity.
Yet there is no need to put hundreds of machines next to each other for miles along the coasts of the Great Lakes. A dozen Vestas like the one in Traverse City could provide power for 2,000-6,000 homes.
We cannot afford to continue wasting energy selfishly. The impact that we are having on our own lives and those of our children by blind consumption has to become our most precious concern. Using coal and oil and nuclear fuels to generate electricity creates such potential for devastation to our health and well being for the planet and all species on this earth.
What is needed is a distribution of power by government and the large utilities back in to the hands of the people - to the collective community - which I do believe would be a much truer sense of democracy, driven by our collective needs.


Going it Alone


Generating your own wind power is still a pricey proposition, but if you’re committed to renewable energy, the resources are out there.
The Bergey Windpower Company in windy Oklahoma, for instance, sells a broad range of wind machines designed for rural homes, remote villages, eco-tourism resorts, farms and other applications.
According to the company, the BWC Excel model pictured here is, “a modern 6.7 meter (22 ft.) diameter, 10,000 Watt wind turbine designed for high reliability, low maintenance, and automatic operation in adverse weather conditions. It is available in two configurations: battery charging and grid-connected.”
Home wind systems typically charge a bank of batteries for those times when the breeze declines to blow. Conversely, when it’s blowing like a tornado, your surplus power can be uploaded to the nation’s power grid (but check with your local power company on the do’s and don’t’s involved).
Wind turbines start at just $2,450 for a 1kW machine suitable for a cottage. But the more useable 7.5 or 10kW machines run around $20,000-$25,000. Then there is the cost of the tower, batteries and incidentals... it all gets back to how committed your wallet is to renewable energy and rugged individualism.


 
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