Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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The brave new world of home remodeling

George Foster - February 23rd, 2006
It all began a year ago when my fiancé insisted we have a real kitchen if she was going to move into my house after the wedding.
Never one to restrict her culinary expertise, I promptly agreed. After discussing all possibilities with a builder and architect, one thing led to another. Soon we had plans for a renovated house twice the size of the existing home and ten times the cost of our idea for a new kitchen. Gulp.
When mentioning the decision to undertake a major remodel of my house, friends said, “Get ready for a real ordeal. Or, “Forget about your life being the same for at least a year.”
How difficult would it be, I thought? The crews could work around me and visa versa. It will be fun. Well, because of my fun-filled building project, 2005 was easily the most stressful year of my life. Here are the rules for residential building and renovation I have learned – the hard way:

(1.) Do not live in your house if major remodeling is taking place. Also, move your possessions to a storage area well before the work begins. I tried to reside in one bedroom with my stuff for a while, but hundreds of workers parading through my house made me realize I am not that sociable. Also, drywall and sawdust permeating every pour of my body and saturating my possessions convinced me to abruptly haul everything to a storage building. Okay, I was virtually homeless for most of 2005 with only a flashlight, muddy boots, and a few clothes on my back. This dismal existence was still preferable to living in an open-aired, construction zone punctuated by the ear-splitting noise of machinery and boom-boxes.
(2.) Any work you hire should start with a written agreement between the parties. One new thing I learned was that each contractor should also sign a waiver of lien upon completion and final payment.
A contractor placed a lien on our house because he didn’t think we were happy with the workmanship (we weren’t) and thought we might not pay the final payment. My wife and I had not violated the agreement. The work by that contractor was incomplete, so the final payment was not due.
It didn’t matter. Michigan law is weighted heavily in favor of the builder when a lien is put on your home. The house can’t be sold or a conventional mortgage secured until the lien is removed. A builder can put a lien on a house with just the stroke of a pen and there is little you can do to contest it. The issue was resolved but not without legal advise and much consternation.
(3.) Hire a professional to help with the building plans. That was our smartest move – by far. We have been happy with the plans from the beginning – it was worth every penny we paid.
(4.) Do NOT become your own general contractor- especially if building trades are not your specialty. Our general contractor was in charge of the framing, trim, windows, roofing, and siding. My wife and I contracted directly with the painters, flooring, heating and plumbing, drywall, and others. At the time, bypassing the general contractor whenever possible seemed to be an easy way to cut costs.
If we did save a little money with that strategy, it was easily eclipsed by the stress and aggravation it caused us. Problems arose when some workers, outside of the supervision of the general contractor, screwed up or just didn’t bother to come to the work site as scheduled. Workmanship issues sometimes took weeks (in one instance – months) to resolve since my wife and I couldn’t be at the site enough to see the problems. Our general contractor did point out many of the issues with the outside workers, but did not wield the same leverage as if he had
hired them.
(5.) Allow at least three more months for the project completion than you anticipate. We had to reschedule our wedding a couple of times to allow me the privilege of carrying the Mrs. across the threshold on that blessed day. It wasn’t a huge problem since our wedding was small, but we originally thought the house would be available months before the wedding. Snow still covered my property when the ceremonial groundbreaking took place in March 2005 – I finally moved back in the house two weeks before our wedding in late October.
(6.) Have a trusted confidant. Though you hear of couples fighting or breaking up over home projects, my wife and I found that we work pretty well together. We made mistakes, but sharing ideas and raising questions with each other probably saved us from creating the ultimate money pit in our house. I suppose that means we are meant to be together – in order to handle the stress of it all. AGGHHHHH.
Hurray, it is over. We do love our house, but I have much more respect for those homeowners who do somehow survive their own remodeling projects. I would still recommend you take a stab at it – if you dare.


 
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