Letters

Letters 08-03-2015

Real Brownfields Deserve Dollars I read with interest the story on Brownfield development dollars in the July 20 issue. I applaud Dan Lathrop and other county commissioners who voted “No” on the Randolph Street project...

Hopping Mad Carlin Smith is hopping mad (“Will You Get Mad With Me?” 7-20-15). Somebody filed a fraudulent return using his identity, and he’s not alone. The AP estimates the government “pays more than $5 billion annually in fraudulent tax refunds.” Well, many of us have been hopping mad for years. This is because the number one tool Congress has used to fix this problem has been to cut the IRS budget –by $1.2 billion in the last 5 years...

Just Grumbling, No Solutions Mark Pontoni’s grumblings [recent Northern Express column] tell us much about him and virtually nothing about those he chooses to denigrate. We do learn that Pontoni may be the perfect political candidate. He’s arrogant, opinionated and obviously dimwitted...

A Racist Symbol I have to respond to Gordon Lee Dean’s letter claiming that the confederate battle flag is just a symbol of southern heritage and should not be banned from state displays. The heritage it represents was the treasonous effort to continue slavery by seceding from a democratic nation unwilling to maintain such a consummate evil...

Not So Thanks I would like to thank the individual who ran into and knocked over my Triumph motorcycle while it was parked at Lowe’s in TC on Friday the 24th. The $3,000 worth of damage was greatly appreciated. The big dent in the gas tank under the completely destroyed chrome badge was an especially nice touch...

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The Secret (and Sometimes Sleazy) Lives of Schoolgirls

Nancy Sundstrom - August 21st, 2003
English writer Rosemary Kingsland and former porn star Traci Lords couldn’t be more dissimilar. Ironically, though, what they have in common is greater, especially that both proved to become objects of male fantasy, something they document with eloquence and effectiveness in memoirs about their lives.
Kingsland ‘s “The Secret Life of a Schoolgirl“ and “Traci Lords: Underneath it All“ by Lords have gotten literary and pop culture circles buzzing with their new books, and with good reason. Kingsland is a respected journalist, screenwriter and novelist who used the opportunity of her autobiography to reveal that as a 14-year-old schoolgirl, she had a long-term, torrid affair with a 29-year-old, married Richard Burton. Lords was just 15-years-old when she became a major star in the porn industry, only to have her career brought to an end with an FBI raid at her home just days after her 18th birthday.
Lest all this just sound salacious and sordid, these are two well-written, thoughtful and often moving chronicles written by women who never saw themselves as victims. Kingsland came from an aristocratic English background and Lords from the poverty of a Midwestern mining town, and though of different eras, both learned at an early age that they could exert great influence over men through their sexuality. Eventually, though, both would need to tell their stories to achieve a decidedly personal means of healing. As they do, they keep readers turning the pages and picking their jaws up off the floor.

The Secret Life of a Schoolgirl by Rosemary Kingsland
While many readers will undoubtedly gravitate to rather explicit sections about Kingsland’s relationship with Burton, this is much more than a kiss-and-tell all, primarily because of the author’s fascinating family history and elegant sense of prose, as witnessed by this early passage:

“There comes a time in a young girl‘s life when she is ripe and ready for love, when there is a richness about her, a glow, a honeyed tumescence that draws men like bees to blossom. Call it what you will, nature, biology, pheromones, or lust, it is the moment, that perfect moment when her hormones are sizzling, when she melts, when her eyes are dewy with promise, when everything about her is sending out urgent messages. In short, nature works overtime to make her absolutely irresistible. For me, as I open this account, that moment had not yet come. There were still two years of preparation, during which I matured from a gauche schoolgirl into a wide-eyed young woman standing on the threshold of adult life... It was a period when sex was a taboo word between the generations. Somehow, my friends and I muddled along, the entire subject concealed in whispers, a carefully guarded adult mystery so impossible to penetrate that we were constantly searching for clues. Even the most obscure references to body parts and suggestive activities in the dictionary, the Bible, or Shakespeare assumed pornographic proportions, which, if read out loud in class, invoked furtive whispers and giggles as notes were passed beneath desks. Anything could set us off... For a time, until we forgot about it, hysteria set in. It seemed our world was full of pitfalls to be avoided, yet most of the time, we didn‘t know what those pitfalls were. However, doing it was high on the list.“

By the time she gets around to “doing it“ with Burton, she knows quite a bit about pitfalls, and the learning curve has just begun. Their relationship, like the one Kingsland has with her family is complicated and more than a little dysfunctional, and she does a wonderful job describing it and them. Particularly effective is the way she brings Burton to life and draws parallels between the tormented Welsh actor (who was creepily carrying on a simultaneous affair with another schoolgirl) and her charismatic father, the implications of which are dissected with a sense of wisdom and awareness. Outside of the Burton factor, this would be a very impressive tale all on its own. With it as a centerpiece, it becomes unforgettable - for a number of reasons.

Traci Lords: Underneath It All by Traci Lords
One gets the impression that if the ship were sinking, you’d wants Lords on it. This woman, whose name (originally Nora Kuzma) has been synonymous with wanton, underage porn, is a survivor in every sense of the word, and her story is nothing short of fascinating, even when it makes one’s skin crawl. In the first chapter, she talks about the second class, third world background she had growing up, factors that were important in her wanting stardom, success and stability and being willing to pay for it with sex:

“I grew up in a dirty little steel town called Steubenville, in eastern Ohio. It was one of those places where everyone was old, or just plain seemed like it. Even the kids felt the times, and the times were tough...The projects were cockroach-ridden matchbox-shaped dwellings inhabited by desperately poor black families who barely survived on meager monthly public assistance checks. It was a place where hungry children played in the gutters of pot-holed streets while munching on sandwiches of Wonder bread and mayonnaise they dubbed “welfare burgers.“ Just a pebble‘s throw away down the hill was the University of Ohio, where professors drove their shiny new cars to garden fund-raisers on the campus lawn. I remember catching glimpses of white tablecloths blowing in the afternoon breeze while ladies in crisp white dresses sipped drinks from tall glasses... But my mother explained that “people like us“ don‘t mix with “people like those.“ “People like what?“ I demanded, meeting the weary look of my mother, who said it was a matter of “social class.“ I was five years old and at the time and didn‘t understand why I wasn‘t one of the chosen few who could receive hot meals and pretty dresses. I only knew that some people had food and others didn‘t, and I was on the wrong side of the fence. I‘d gather crab apples from my great-granny‘s yard and hurl them in protest toward the happy people down the hill. Although my targets were never struck, I felt justice had been served.“

Because she became a prominent porn star at age 15 (thanks to a fake i.d..), there isn’t much of a time lapse between her days in Ohio and being Penthouse Pet of the Month. From that point on, it’s sex, drugs, deceit and sleaze, until the FBI bust, where Lords was made a target as part of the Reagan Administration’s efforts to crack down on porn. There were more chapters to be written on her life after this, though, and what follows proves to be as compelling, if not more so, than everything leading up to it.
Frank and tough-talking, Lords doesn’t shy away from the dirt in her life, and there’s plenty of it, to be sure. Still, redemption is always possible, and by the end of her story, she provides a convincing case that one can triumph over the past and find the health and happiness that come only from self esteem, forgiveness and the simple determination to not have it any other way.

 
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