Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Bug Art
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Bug Art

- December 14th, 2006
One of the most bizarre things you’re likely to see this year (or any year) is the new installation of bug art at the Dennos Museum Center: “A Terrible Beauty: Compulsion and Repulsion,” which runs December 10-March 4.
The installation by artist Jennifer Angus features 5,500 exotic insects collected from around the world and arranged in compelling patterns.
Angus’s installations for “A Terrible Beauty” are based around the idea of collecting in Victorian times, the exotic nature of what was collected and the eccentric nature of the collectors themselves. The exhibition at the Dennos Museum Center will be divided into two rooms or galleries – a blue room where the “acceptable” collections of an eccentric collector are housed, and a red room where the “hidden” collections, shown only to certain people, reside. The galleries will feature text quotes from noted figures of the Victorian era such as Charles Darwin and from the literature of the day.
Jennifer Angus creates large-scale installations featuring exotic dried and preserved insects camouflaged within a framework of beautiful designs, usually based on wallpaper or lettered statements where
the letters that make the words are composed of insects.                                                              
Angus is an artist, educator, writer and curator living in Madison, Wisconsin. She has exhibited her work internationally. Three of her pieces are in the permanent collection of the Canadian Embassy in Bangkok, Thailand.
“There is often confusion as to whether the insects in my work are real,” she says. “Yes, they are, although they are dead and dried. The colours are their natural colour. I have not painted them. I have spent considerable time in Southeast Asia, particularly Thailand and Malaysia where most of the insects
I work with come from.
“None of these species are endangered,” she adds. “They have been purchased through reputable insect specimen dealers throughout North America, Europe and Asia. They are initially collected by indigenous peoples who live in and around the rain forest.
These people have a vested interest in
protecting the rain forest, for harvesting insects provides a livelihood. Furthermore, it is ecologically sound for they are a renew-able resource. Ever heard the saying that where there is one cockroach there are 100? It’s true and this applies to the vast majority of insect species.”

The Dennos Museum Center is open daily, 10 AM to 5 PM, and Sundays 1-5 PM. Admission is $4 adults, $2 children and free to Museum
members. For more information on the Museum and exhibition, go to www.dennosmuseum.org
or call 231-995-1055.

 
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