Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · He‘s a Magic Man
. . . .

He‘s a Magic Man

Carina Hume - January 11th, 2007
There’s been a lot of magic in Harry Colestock’s life: He helped put John Glenn Jr. into space, enabled surgeons to efficiently melt a knot at the end of a suture, and puts smiles on the faces of many with his magic act.
A resident of Walloon Lake, Harry’s magical beginnings go back to his childhood. Born in 1923, Colestock was a child of the Great Depression who quickly learned the value of work. When his father lost his job, the family sold their house, purchased a five-acre piece of property just west of Birmingham, and lived in a tent.
“Some business in Detroit took pity on us and gave us a house that was on their property if we tore it down and moved it,” remembers Colestock.
The oldest boy out of five siblings, he and his two brothers and father worked hard to rebuild that house during the summer of 1933. “I think that taught us the purpose of work that year,” says Colestock who learned the basics of being an electrician from his father. “I consider that one of the best lessons I ever had.”

MAGIC CALLS
As a reward for his work on the house, Colestock received a ticket from his father to attend a magic show. Harry Blackstone, Sr. was performing at the local theater.
“Harry called me up on the stage during the show,” recalls Colestock, “and he was quite fascinated that I had the same name he did. He made a big deal out of that and he did a couple tricks where I was the participant in the tricks. Well, I was hooked!”
To earn extra money as a child, Colestock took care of 35 muskrat traps along with milking the family’s cows and feeding the chickens.
“I would send away (for tricks). There was no magic shop at that time in Ann Arbor,” says Colestock. “Then I had to start inventing… because I didn’t have the money to buy them.” He did some magic shows at school and began to develop a real hobby.
In 1990 at a magic convention, Colestock introduced an automaton (robot) that looked just like magician Jay Marshall who performed a 15-minute skit featuring a rabbit puppet named Lefty (Marshall’s hand in disguise) who bantered with the magician. Colestock’s efforts granted him a lifetime membership into the Society of American Magicians and a meeting with Marshall, who was in the audience that day.
“He couldn’t believe I had built the automaton of him,” recalls Colestock. “He came up on stage afterwards and we had a real good meeting.” The automaton has since been donated to the American Museum of Magic in Marshall, Michigan.
In 1992 Colestock was named Magician of the Year by the International Brotherhood of Magicians, of which he’s still a member. He spent nearly 15 years as president of the Ann Arbor Magic Club.

A MICHIGAN EDUCATION
After Colestock graduated valedictorian of his high school class in 1941, he attended Michigan State University on scholarship for a year and a half before being called away to fight in World War II. After three years as a member of the Air Transport Command in the U.S. Air Force, Colestock returned to college on the GI Bill, with a wife and son in tow. The availability of married housing at Ann Arbor’s University of Michigan campus and a job as an electrician in the Willow Run/Ypsilanti area guided his decision.
Graduating with a degree in electrical engineering in 1949, Colestock began his career in Schenectady, N.Y. testing products at General Electric. His wife’s homesickness brought the family back to Michigan after only two years. During Colestock’s varied career he worked with Bendix Aerospace Systems, Ingersoll-Rand, Burroughs Corporation and in Australia for General Motors’ Holden division. He received an MBA in 1973 from Indiana Northern University, now known as Valparaiso.

NO ROOM FOR FAILURE
The highlight of Colestock’s career was in the late 1950s when he was chief engineer at Burroughs Corporation. After a competition between the three largest computer manufacturers during that time – IBM, Burroughs and Remington-Rand – Burroughs was selected by NASA to design a computer that would not fail.
“How do you design something that will not fail?” recalls Colestock, after being taught all his life that at some point, everything fails. Turning his problem over to God – as Colestock still does for a tough one – he came up with a design that has been a pattern for super-reliable computers to this day. It was a design for the guidance computer for the Atlas missile used in 1962 to send John Glenn Jr. on the first manned U.S. orbital mission in space.
“People all over the world copied that design when they had to have a computer that was most resistant to failure,” says Colestock, proudly, pointing out that the Atlas missile guidance system was even used recently to send a missile to Saturn.
For a man who prides himself on his work ethic – one he’s instilled in both of his sons – it’s no surprise that Colestock has 42 patents credited to his name, most of them in circuit design. The most recent were awarded in the 1990s: a new type of heart pump designed with six surgeons from the University of Michigan Hospital and a product which melts a knot at the end of a suture, now manufactured in a Boston-area company.
UP NORTH
After the passing of his first wife in 2000, Colestock married Marilyn Stockwell, a fellow watercolor artist, in 2001. Marilyn’s love for the Walloon Lake area led the couple north in 2003, where they built their self-designed dream home on a lot with a view of Walloon Lake. Both are members of the Michigan Water Color Society, the Northern Michigan Chorale and the choir at the First Presbyterian Church.
Since the move, Colestock has performed over 30 magic shows for area schools and scouting troops, taking with him a black wooden case which turns into a free-standing magic platform full of tricks. Silk colored handkerchiefs, colored pom-poms and various card tricks are hidden within.
In May of 2005, Colestock’s first technical book, “Industrial Robotics,” was published by McGraw-Hill. It teaches businesses how to achieve maximum productivity with robotics and answers any questions people may have. Another book called, “How to Design and Build Your Own Automaton,” and a children’s book on magic are in the works, to go along with Colestock’s self-published book of poems.
At the age of 83, most retirees would feel they’ve given enough back to the community, but Colestock doesn’t share that sentiment. In one of his home workshops are remnants of his latest project: the light strands to illuminate several two-dimensional silhouettes designed by at-risk youth from Lakeview Academy for their upcoming exhibit.
“I believe God expects us to do something special with the lives he has given us, to be enthusiastic with the gifts we’ve been given and joyful in the sharing them with others.”
 
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