Letters

Letters 07-25-2016

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

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4Play

Ross Boissoneau - March 2nd, 2006
Livingston Taylor – There You Are Again – Whistling Dog

James’s little brother has never been as prolific or as acclaimed as JT. That’s too bad, and those who haven’t been paying attention have missed some fine work, which continues on “There You Are Again.” The poignant “Best of Friends” kicks off the disc, a duet with his former sister-in-law, Carly Simon. The family connections continue with “There I’ll Be” with James and James’s (and Carly’s) daughter Kate, and throughout the album it sounds as if Livingston has invited over a bunch of friends to play. The music and mood are thoroughly relaxed, easily crafted, but that belies the quality of the songs. The same criticism of James has also been applied to Livingston, only more so: that the music is so relaxed and well-crafted that it is all just too casual. That’s just plain wrong. The arrangements here are enchanting, and the performances are as well. Find this disc and put it in your favorites pile.


Jesse Harris – Mineral – Secret Sun

Norah Jones’s guitarist and songwriter, Jesse Harris first came to public notice with “Come Away With Me,” Jones’s Grammy-winning debut. He has also worked with The Ferdinados, and his own solo albums are minimalist, folky and gently alluring. His voice has almost the same kind of relaxed breathiness as that of Jones, but he sings in tune more. And while this music can’t be categorized as jazz, really, is that of Jones? Chances are, those who have made Jones a superstar will be nearly as enthralled with Harris’s own music. There are a couple missteps on “Mineral,” such as “Corrina Corrina,” and the following “The Speed of Sound,” both of which are just a little too precious, though the latter’s vibes and kalimba by jazz keyboard great Larry Goldings are fine fun.


Michael Bublé – With Love – Hallmark

It’s all about the love on singer Michael Bublé’s new album, available exclusively at Hallmark stores through the end of February. With only two new songs, it’s hardly a new album, and its thematic unity gives it a sameness that doesn’t serve it well. That said, each cut individually is engaging and romantic, with Bublé singing with his heart on his sleeve. Every song is heartfelt and receives the full Bublé treatment. Here that means he uses his stunning voice on tracks that are so well-worn as to be mundane, and all but “Can’t Help Falling In Love” make the grade. The best cuts are probably “My Funny Valentine” and “These Foolish Things (Remind Me Of You).” Bublé  is finally getting the press he deserves, and “With Love,” with its focus on the Valentine’s season and the unique distribution deal with Hallmark may help to expand his audience.


Tempest – The Double Cross – Magna Carta

Multi-national folk/prog outfit Tempest blends music from across the world. Norwegian leader Lief Sorbye on mandolins, guitars, and lead vocals works with an American violinist, a Cuban drummer, an Irish guitarist, and Austrian female bassist. The music is musically rich, with nods to sea chanteys, ripping prog/new age instrumentals, even a backhanded swipe at Led Zepellin, with the cut “Hangman” resembling Zep’s “Gallows Pole” both lyrically and musically. Sorbye is a bit of an acquired taste as a vocalist, resembling Jethro Tull’s Ian Anderson at times. The band can also sound a bit Tullish, or maybe British folk contemporaries Steeleye Span (as on “Whoever You Are”). Ultimately the band sounds like no one so much as itself, the mandolins and fiddles churning against the solid rhythms and guest/producer Robert Berry’s keyboards.  
  

 
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