Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · The Art of Africa comes to Dennos
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The Art of Africa comes to Dennos

- March 22nd, 2007
The classic African masks, sculpture and jewelry at a new exhibit at the Dennos Museum Center may have the look of artifacts that could be hundreds or even thousands of years old, but their timeless quality continues to influence the creation of art in our own time and culture.
European encounters with the arts of the African peoples south of the Sahara desert profoundly influenced 20th century Western art, contributing to the styles of many noted artists, such as Picasso, who was known for using African mask forms in his paintings.
The Dennos at Northwestern Michigan College presents the exhibition, “Spirits, Relics and Rituals: The John F. Korachis Collection of African Art,” from March 25 to September 2. The collection was assembled by John Korachis who had a lifelong passion for collecting iconographic objects of Africa.
Throughout the 20th century, a growing interest in African art in the Western world spurred collecting by museums and private individuals. It also encouraged research, throwing light on the history, meaning and significance of African art. Indigenous African arts generally tended to be functional and often had some social relevance within the cultures that produced them. Masks and carved figures were part of daily life of peoples and communities and might have been featured in periodic religious activities.
As collecting of African artworks expanded in the last century, African artists sought to meet the rising demand by producing versions of original cultural objects. These works were not always used in a functional way by the various African societies; still they reflected the forms, styles and subject matter of known original pieces that inspired them.
The John F. Korachis Collection of African Art is composed primarily of objects created in the 20th century. These works often reflect the interpretations of individual artists who have drawn upon the artistry of their predecessors while adding their own details to the works. In some cases, such recent works stand alone as art objects, blending influences from multiple African cultural groups. As such they offer insights into the dynamism of African cultures and the extraordinary craftsmanship and inventiveness of contemporary African artists working in the traditional style. Hence we can use this imagery to understand the lifestyles and beliefs of Africa’s diverse cultures.
The exhibition’s geographic focus is the two broad regions of Western and Central Africa and encompasses cultures located in the modern nations of Liberia, Sierra Leone, Ivory Coast (Cote d’Ivoire), Ghana, Cameroon, Gabon and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

An opening reception for the exhibit will be held Saturday, March 24 beginning at 6:30 pm with a concert featuring the African Guitar Summit from Toronto, Canada at 8:00 pm. The Juno Award winning group features Canada’s top African born guitarists who are making their first tour of the United States with this appearance. Tickets for the reception and concert are $25 ($20 for Museum members) and can be purchased through the Museum Box Office at 231-995-1553. Attendees are invited to dress in African costume.




African Jewelry Sale
An African trunk sale featuring West African mud cloth, batik, kente cloth, clothing and textiles, along with handcrafted sterling silver jewelry, semi-precious stone jewelry, ancient beads and much more is presented in anticipation of the opening reception for the exhibition “Spirits, Relics and Rituals.”
Attendees are invited to dress in African costume and the trunk sale will provide the opportunity to find a special article of clothing or jewelry to wear to the event. The sale will feature the collection of Ann Murice, a designer and manufacturer from California who spent many years living and traveling throughout Africa in the1960s. Her textile collection focuses on the West African countries of Burkina Faso, Mali and Togo. Today she continues to buy and sell fabrics and jewelry and creates her own original clothing and jewelry designs. She is most inspired by “mud cloth” or bokolanfini (pictured) and has amassed quite a collection of traditional African fabrics and old beads. The clothing in the sale is made from the fabrics she collects on her African travels.
The sale will feature Fulani earrings worn by the Fulani women of Mali. These earrings are either passed down through generations or given as a gift from husband to wife.  The metal is repeatedly heated and hammered into thin blades and then twisted into shape. Also shown will be Tuareg jewelry of sterling silver that has been handcrafted by the Tuareg people of Niger {West Africa}. The Tuareg are nomads of the Sahara and have worked silver for centuries. The jewelry has beautiful geometric patterns incised in the silver and many pieces are inlaid with semi-precious stones and wood.

For more information on the sale contact Terry Tarnow, Museum store manager, at 231-995-1587 or ttarnow@nmc.edu.

 
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