Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

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The Glory of Getting Mother‘s Body

Nancy Sundstrom - July 17th, 2003
If the title alone isn’t enough to intrigue you, scan through the first few paragraphs of “Getting Mother’s Body“ by Suzan-Lori Parks. Parks is a wonderful writer whose has accomplished something quite special with this, her fiction debut, and the reader knows it almost immediately by the way her musical prose comes swinging out of the corner.
A novelist, playwright, songwriter, and screenwriter, Parks is perhaps best known for crafting “Topdog/Underdog,“ the play that won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Gifted and versatile, her other plays are “F------ A,“ “In the Blood,“ “The America Play,“ “Venus“ and “The Death of the Last Black Man in the Whole Entire World.“ Her first feature film, “Girl 6,“ and she has a staggering range of exciting projects on the horizon now, including writing an adaptation of Toni Morrison’s novel “Paradise“ for Oprah Winfrey, and the musical “Hoopz“ for Disney.
But to clear the way for those endeavors, she had to complete her first novel, and late this spring, “Getting Mother’s Body“ was released to considerable acclaim, with critics likening it to the classic works of Morrison, Zora Neale Hurston and Alice Walker. While there is strong basis for comparison, this book has a singular, infectious style and a remarkably unforgettable group of characters that distinguish it from anything else that has come before and, once again, Parks as a literary force to be reckoned with.
It is the story of Billy Beede, the dirt-poor teenage daughter of the “fast-running, no-account, and six-years-dead Willa Mae.“ One day, Billy receives a letter saying that Willa Mae’s burial spot in Arizona is about to become a grocery store, and as her only daughter, she has to take possession of the body, but in doing so, may also become the caretaker of a cache of jewels believe to be buried with her.
Nearly everyone around Billy or who knew Willa Mae has a stake in finding out if the gems really exist, and that list includes Snipes, Billy’s lover. In the opening we meet the twosome as they spar about possible marriage after a quickie make-out session in the back seat of a car on a dusty road outside a small Texas town in the early 1960‘s:

“You gonna marry me or what?“ I says.
The words come out too loud. He don’t speak. He cuts on the radio but it don’t work when the car ain’t running. He gets out, closing the back two doors, leaving mines open and getting back behind the wheel.
“Sure I’’m gonna marry you,“ he says at last. “You my treasure. You think I don’t wanna marry my treasure?“
“People are talking,“ I says..“I’m five months gone,“ I says. Too loud again. He wraps his fingers tight around the wheel. I want him to look at me but he don’’t...
“Today’s Wednesday, ain’t it?““ Snipes says. He looks down the road, seeing his upcoming appointments in his head. “I’’m free towards the end of the week. Let’s get married on Friday.“
“Friday’’s the day,“ he says, taking out his billfold. He peeks the money part open with his pointer and thumb, then he feathers the bills, counting. His one eyebrow lifts up, surprised. “That’s what you call significant,“ he says.
“What year is it?“
“And here I got sixty-three dollars in my billfold,“ he says smiling. He pinches the bills out, folding them single-handed. He reaches over to me, lifting my housedress away from my brassiere and tucking the sixty-three dollars down between my breasts. “Get yourself a wedding dress and some shoes and a one-way bus ticket.““
“I’ma go to Jackson’s Formal.“
“Get something pretty. Come up to Texhoma tomorrow. We can do it Friday.“
“You gonna get down on yr knee and ask me?“
“You come up tomorrow and I’ll get down on my knee in front of my sister and her kids and ask you to marry me.“
“Hell, I’ll get down on both knees. Then we can do it Friday.“
“How bout today you meet Aunt June and Uncle Teddy?“ I says.
“Today I gotta go to Midland,“ he says.
“It’ll only take a minute.“
“I don’t got a minute,“ he says. He looks at me. He got lips like pillows. “Have em come to Texhoma Friday. They can watch us get married. I’ll meet em then.“
“When they come up you gotta ask me to marry you on yr knees in front of them too,“ I says. “They’’d feel left out if they didn’t see it since you’’ll be asking me in front of yr sister and her kids and yr mother and dad——“
“My mother and dad won’t be making it,“ Snipes says.
“How come?“
“They’s passed,“ he says. He starts up the car, turning it around neatly and pulling it into the road, heading back towards Lincoln. On Friday my new name will be Mrs. Clifton Snipes.
“I was ten when Willa Mae passed,“ I says.
“Willa Mae who?“
“Willa Mae Beede. My mother,“ I says.
Snipes takes his hand off the wheel to scratch his crotch. His foot is light on the gas pedal. There’s a story about my mother. All these months I been seeing Snipes, I didn’t know whether or not he’d heard it. Now I can tell he has.“

As her only daughter, Billy is heiress to Willa Mae’s fortune, which her lover, Dill Smiles, is said to have buried with her. Finding the cache could mean all the difference in the world to Billy, especially since she is pregnant and unmarried, so she decides to enlist her aunt and uncle in the process of uncovering it. From the onset, she makes a number of questionable decisions, such as stealing Dill‘s pickup, which puts him in hot pursuit, and the subsequent turn of events all seem as if they’ll also have disaster stamped all over them, right up to the end.
In Parks’ capable hands, the characters and the action are riotously funny and never predictable. The creation of Billy is particularly wonderful accomplishment, though to be fair, nearly every role is something of a minor miracle. At least a dozen challenging themes, from love and family to redemption and self-esteem are tackled in the book and emerge with new sheens of insight and discovery. This work is nothing short of glorious, and its author a revelation.

  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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