Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Storehouse of Memories
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Storehouse of Memories

Sandra Serra Bradshaw - April 27th, 2006
Walk into the Little Traverse History Museum on the Petoskey waterfront and you’ll stroll through the region’s past. It’s a past that has special significance this year in that the Little Traverse Historical Society is entering its second century as stewards of the region’s memories.
Over the past 100 years, the Historical Society has conserved Petoskey’s past, culminating in a storehouse of memories in the museum at Bayfront Park.
In 1969, The Little Traverse History Museum was incorporated as a non- profit organization to showcase the history of Emmett County.  Its motto is, “to preserve, advance and disseminate knowledge of the history of the Little Traverse Bay area,” said Candace Fitzsimons, director of the LTHM.  Fitzsimons has been director here for the last 16 years.

14,000 VISITORS
The museum is located in the renovated historic Petoskey depot, erected in 1892 by the Chicago and Western Michigan Railroad. It was a time when train depots were meant to be attractive and welcoming as visitors escaped the cities and flocked to Up North.
The depot became part of the Pere Marquette Railroad in 1899.  In 1947, it merged with the Chesapeake and Ohio line.  It was abandoned in the 1950s - fewer visitors were arriving by train – the automobile now reigned.
But today, the depot’s transformation into a museum is just as welcoming to visitors.
“The museum attracts approximately 14,000 persons annually,” Fitzsimons said.  In the museum’s center lobby there is an exhibit on permanent display of memorabilia, relating to Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Ernest Hemingway.  
“It is a favorite exhibit for many visitors -- and visitors come from all over the world,” Fitzsimons noted.
“The exhibit helps our visitors learn how important northern Michigan was to Hemingway as a young man,” explained Fitzsimons.  “Hemingway spent the first 18 summers of his life in our region. We showcase the special haunts and landmarks that Hemingway later wrote about in his novels.”  
The museum includes the documentary narrated by his nephew, Ernest Hemingway Mainland, signed first editions and family pictures. Much of the showcase includes items donated by family and others such as furniture, photographs and signed copies of much of his beloved works.
“His style of writing somehow just connects  – his work somehow captures the reader – it seems as if they find something within themselves reading his books,” Fitzsimons said. “They will go to any length to see his memorabilia.  Hemingway devotees have come from as far away as Russia and Turkey.”
BACK TO THE FUTURE
In the East Wing exhibits includes highlights of such area notables as Ephraim Shay and Chief Petoskey, along with the backstory on Bay View, Boyne USA, and Bay Harbor among others. The museum also has an extensive collection of Native American artifacts -- including Odawa arrowheads, tools and quillwork -- which has proved very popular among visitors.
Recent exhibits have included work by 20th century potters Stanley Kellogg of Petoskey and Eric Strader, of Indiana. Another focus is that of commemorating Ottawa Chief Ignatius Petoskey with a statue.
Close to 100 volunteers assist the bayside facility as well as satellite museums at Bay Harbor, Cross Village, and rotating exhibits at the Pellston Regional Airport. Bay Harbor is open year-‘round in the shopping district near the Bay Harbor marina, while the Cross Village Museum maintains summer hours and closes on Labor Day weekend.

Little Traverse History Museum’s public viewing hours for the off-season are Monday – Saturday from 1-4 p.m. Admission is $1 adults with children welcome at no charge. Also visit the Bay Harbor History Museum and Signature Store located at the Village at Bay Harbor, Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
 
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