Letters

Letters 04-14-14

Benishek Inching

Regarding “Benishek No Environmentalist” I agree with Mr. Powell’s letter to the editor/ opinion of Congressman Dan Benishek’s poor environmental record and his penchant for putting corporate interests ahead of his constituents’...

Climate Change Warning

Currently there are three assaults on climate change. The first is on the integrity of the scientists who support human activity in climate change. Second is that humans are not capable of affecting the climate...

Fed Up About Roads

It has gotten to the point where I cringe when I have to drive around this area. There are areas in Traverse City that look like a war zone. When you have to spend more time viewing potholes instead on concentrating on the road, accidents are bound to happen...

Don’t Blame the IRS

I have not heard much about the reason for the IRS getting itself entangled with the scrutiny of certain conservative 501(c) groups (not for profit) seeking tax exemption. Groups seeking tax relief must be organizations that are operated “primarily for the purpose of bringing about civic betterment and social improvements.”


Home · Articles · News · Letters · Letters 7/17/03
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Letters 7/17/03

Various - July 17th, 2003
Bike was stolen

You all can laugh at me (like it isn‘t no big deal), but my bike got stolen tonight. It was a metallic orange, black pinstriped cruiser, designed by Von Frank.
I can‘t replace it ( I say that in case anyone has seen it). At first I was just angry, then I remembered that it was Traverse City spring break. Where the shallow, selfish, intoxicated, and underage get to rule the town, ‘cause their parents pay for it. They get drunk, they have sex in chemical bathrooms, they drink and they steal.
My question to the Cherry Festival “Captains“: is this worth it? We all (local residents), know that you, (the local government), fudge the tourist numbers. It‘s really a joke. There is no money coming in, except the quick buck accepted by the self-appointed leaders of the community. This small town turns into “Spring Break,“ and like every other vacation town, Traverse City is more than ready than to bend over for the cash, like a tired old whore.
The only things growing here are condominiums, not cherries. Why not call it the “condominium festival.“ The only cherries pimped out to the tourists are from Washington State. Get honest. The lost and lonely are allowed to run rampant in this town. Throwing their pennies around, scorned by local merchants, actually tolerated at best.
Anyway the bike had been safe. Since I bought it from Brick Wheels two years ago, I‘ve kept it on the street untouched. What I‘m saying here is that I don‘t like the people drawn into this community during the Cherry Festival, I don‘t believe there is any financial gain, and the town is trashed and disrespected. It‘s the only time that I‘m concerned about thieves. I say to community leaders: if you want ugly in your town then import from South Central L.A. Get honest, get real, and deal with it.
And by the way, while I‘m at it, stop ignoring the homeless. They live under the bridges and on the beaches, and does anyone even care? You think that you can hide the reality of this town? Just try. People like me won‘t let you. This town is not “pretty“ -- we are overbuilt, polluted, overpopulated and cold. We are unconcerned about those in need. “Community“ isn‘t about money, It‘s about people. It‘s actually about people.

Mike Morey • TC

Making sweet music

Surely you can find something else to whine about other than the fact the new “buskers“ ordinance has restrictions (Random Thoughts, July 3). The fact that there is even an ordinance is ground-breaking. Restrictions are not defned and enforced because communities are “upper-midwestern-uptight.“ Our litigious society has seen to that. Just ask the city folks in Key West. Mallory Square has its fabulous share of “buskers.“ Have you ever noticed that they do not perform wherever they wish in that community? There are reasons, sir. I applaud our city commission for taking precautions so that citizen tax dollars are not wasted on lawsuits.
Instead, lets celebrate the fact that our community will be culturally richer in light of the new ordinance. Wow, perhaps some spaces that have been designed for performance and congregation that are underutilized may now be re-discovered. I cite the space in front of the Chamber of Commerce, the entrance space at the Clinch Park Zoo, the Open Space, etc. The “hip-hop group that‘s really dope“ that‘s “really itching to get your crew down on the streets to bust a few moves“ needs room do that! It would be tragic if they were struck by a “fudgie-mobile.“ The 100-300 blocks of Front St. are full of merchants who want people to shop. Let‘s let them shop, safely.
And if pickle bucket bangers would give away the pickles to their audience before they start banging . . . food always draws a crowd!

Sally Guzowski • TC

BATA worth to the community

July 29, BATA will be asking the taxpayers of Grand Traverse and Leelanau County for a small millage increase. Why would taxpayers vote “yes“ to a service that is used by a small number of people? What does BATA service accomplish, and by what expenditure of resources?
BATA is public transportation, which is a social service. That is, it is designed to promote the welfare of the community and the individual. The following are just a few of the services BATA performs for our community: Transporting employees and volunteers to hospitals, nursing homes, blood banks, the Senior Citizens Center, and dialysis. Also, busing children to schools, Boys and Girls Club, the Civic Center, and other functions throughout the two-county area. In addition, BATA provides rides to the disabled so they can enjoy opportunities in the community.
Regarding expenditures, there is indeed a price for transporting people to various locations, but what would be the price without BATA‘s service? What is the price for independence, freedom, and dignity?

Richard Pittman • BATA driver • TC

BATA & kids

In response to letters about saving money by cutting BATA funding:
BATA transports high school students to both Central and West. A few years back TCAPS eliminated their busing because of budget shortfalls. With no BATA, who will pick up the tab?
BATA busses deliver area residents to doctor and therapy appointments through Munson‘s Health Ride. It might be a windfall for the local taxi companies if this service is cut, but who do you think will pay the tab for elderly and low-income patients who can‘t drive?
Our area is home to a higher than average number of seniors. Many take BATA to shopping, appointments, the senior center and church events, some because of difficulty driving at night or in heavy traffic. What options will they have if BATA folds? To stay home or to ignore physical limitations and get back behind the wheel? We‚ll all pay through increased insurance premiums and public safety services.
Our most affordable housing is outside the city. Fixed bus routes make it possible for many living on lower incomes to travel into town for jobs, medical care and other necessities. The cost of unemployment and welfare benefits paid to those who can‚t make it into work comes out of the public budget, undoubtedly at a higher rate than a BATA millage.
And what about those among us who can‘t drive because of a physical or mental handicap? There but for the grace of some higher spirit go all of us.
Its been said that one measure of a society is how well its senior citizens and children are treated. On July 29 we have the opportunity to support our public transportation system or to dismantle it. Lets measure up Traverse City. Vote “yes“ to keep BATA on the road.

Kathleen Prentice • TC

BATA cares

Public Transportation is an absolute must. Having been employed by BATA
for more than four years, I‘ve come to appreciate the organization as both a
valued service organization, but also as a decent and challenging place to
work. BATA employees care about their customers, which makes the upcoming
millage so important. Literally thousands of residents throughout the two
county service area depend upon BATA services and we feel the absolute
obligation to provide the service while fulfilling their need. Without a
“Yes“ vote on July 29, that will be impossible.
During my 21 years of military service, I was able to witness
first hand public transportation throughout the United States as well as
overseas and how important it is for those who use it daily, weekly, monthly
or on an occasional basis. One may ask, why vote for the millage if I don‘t
use the service? I‘ll tell you why! If the service were not available, whom
would the current users turn to for their ride to work, school, dialysis,
radiation therapy, the doctor, grocery store, the local pharmacy or to
visit a loved one? They would tend to lean on friends, neighbors and family
members who may not otherwise have the time or resources to provide a ride.
BATA is an essential part of the community and its existence and growth
potential must remain. Please exercise your right to vote... and vote
“Yes-Yes“ on July 29th.

Mike Fegan • TC

Price of a lie

A former president was accused of Iying to the American people. An independent counsel at the cost of $70 million conducted a thorough investigation.
Our current president appears to have lied to the American people. Remember weapons of mass destruction? Cost to date $62 Billion -- that‘s Billion with a capital B folks, and still counting

Robert Bucklin • Houghton, MI

Speak out on bridge

Unbelievably, the Grand Traverse County Road Commission hasn‘t stopped its quest to spend $40 million on a new road and bridge over the Boardman River Valley to connect Hartman and Hammond Roads. It is incomprehensible that some people who live here are apparently blind to the treasure we have. Maybe it‘s time they spent a month commuting in LA, Washington D.C., or San Francisco -- then they‘d understand what traffic congestion is.
The proposed bridge would destroy one of Grand Traverse County‘s most beautiful areas and irreparably harm the environment. (Have you considered where the runoff of salt and sand from the winter months and the oil and gas from the vehicles that will inevitably clog the new bridge go? Hmm. Into the Boardman River and out to the bay?)
On July 17 a public hearing with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality will be held to consider the Road Commission‘s application to fill wetlands and alter streams. The public hearing will be in the Little Theater Room at West Junior High School on West Silver Lake Road at 6:30 p.m.
Everyone‘s voice is needed that night to assure the DEQ that the residents of Grand Traverse County appreciate the beauty and quiet of this area and recognize that there are smarter and significantly less costly alternatives to this proposal (check out: www.mlui.org).
Lets not pave over the paradise that is ours to enjoy. If this project goes through the Boardman River Valley will be harmed forever. Let your voice be heard on July 17.

Mary Jo Zazueta • TC




 
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