Letters

Letters 04-14-14

Benishek Inching

Regarding “Benishek No Environmentalist” I agree with Mr. Powell’s letter to the editor/ opinion of Congressman Dan Benishek’s poor environmental record and his penchant for putting corporate interests ahead of his constituents’...

Climate Change Warning

Currently there are three assaults on climate change. The first is on the integrity of the scientists who support human activity in climate change. Second is that humans are not capable of affecting the climate...

Fed Up About Roads

It has gotten to the point where I cringe when I have to drive around this area. There are areas in Traverse City that look like a war zone. When you have to spend more time viewing potholes instead on concentrating on the road, accidents are bound to happen...

Don’t Blame the IRS

I have not heard much about the reason for the IRS getting itself entangled with the scrutiny of certain conservative 501(c) groups (not for profit) seeking tax exemption. Groups seeking tax relief must be organizations that are operated “primarily for the purpose of bringing about civic betterment and social improvements.”


Home · Articles · News · Art · Rodin
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Rodin

- May 11th, 2006
Master of human expression strides through the Dennos
When one thinks of sculpture, one name towers above all others: Auguste Rodin is to bronze what William Shakespeare is to theatre or Robert Johnson is to the blues.
So a new exhibit, “Rodin: In His Own Words,” offers a rare chance to see the work of the French master of the human form at the Dennos Museum Center in Traverse City. The exhibit, which opened April 29 and runs through August 6, features 35 of the artist’s bronze sculptures in addition to a selection of his original letters and an explanation of the 10-step “lost-wax” casting process.
The exhibit spans the entire range of Rodin’s legacy from early works “The Mask of the Man with the Broken Nose” and “Saint John the Baptist Preaching,” to studies from some of Rodin’s major monuments such as “The Gates of Hell” and “The Burghers of Calais.” Also included are Rodin’s statues of the artists “Claude Lorrain” and “Jules Bastien-Lepage” from the heyday of the Parisian art scene.
At the peak of his career Auguste Rodin (1840–1917) was regarded as the greatest sculptor since Michelangelo. Leaving behind 19th-century academic traditions, Rodin created his own form of artistic expression. He focused on the vitality of the human spirit by using a vigorous modeling technique that emphasized his personal response to the tale being told. His works were purposely obscure in their meaning, allowing the viewer to bring his or her own imagination to bear in the story behind the work.
Today, Rodin’s pioneering figurative sculpture is considered a crucial link between traditional and modern art.
“We are very pleased bring this wonderful exhibition to the Grand Traverse region,” says Eugene Jenneman, Director of the Dennos Museum Center, “It is a fine exhibition to offer during our 15th anniversary year and a great opportunity for students to encounter one the great figurative sculptors of all time during our traditional school field trip season.”
The exhibition is courtesy of the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, which provided the collection. The Dennos is open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 1-5 p.m. Admission is $4 adults, $2 for children and free to museum members.
For more information on the museum go to www.dennosmuseum.org or call 231-995-1055. The Dennos is located at the entrance to Northwestern Michigan College.
 
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