Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Art · Rodin
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Rodin

- May 11th, 2006
Master of human expression strides through the Dennos
When one thinks of sculpture, one name towers above all others: Auguste Rodin is to bronze what William Shakespeare is to theatre or Robert Johnson is to the blues.
So a new exhibit, “Rodin: In His Own Words,” offers a rare chance to see the work of the French master of the human form at the Dennos Museum Center in Traverse City. The exhibit, which opened April 29 and runs through August 6, features 35 of the artist’s bronze sculptures in addition to a selection of his original letters and an explanation of the 10-step “lost-wax” casting process.
The exhibit spans the entire range of Rodin’s legacy from early works “The Mask of the Man with the Broken Nose” and “Saint John the Baptist Preaching,” to studies from some of Rodin’s major monuments such as “The Gates of Hell” and “The Burghers of Calais.” Also included are Rodin’s statues of the artists “Claude Lorrain” and “Jules Bastien-Lepage” from the heyday of the Parisian art scene.
At the peak of his career Auguste Rodin (1840–1917) was regarded as the greatest sculptor since Michelangelo. Leaving behind 19th-century academic traditions, Rodin created his own form of artistic expression. He focused on the vitality of the human spirit by using a vigorous modeling technique that emphasized his personal response to the tale being told. His works were purposely obscure in their meaning, allowing the viewer to bring his or her own imagination to bear in the story behind the work.
Today, Rodin’s pioneering figurative sculpture is considered a crucial link between traditional and modern art.
“We are very pleased bring this wonderful exhibition to the Grand Traverse region,” says Eugene Jenneman, Director of the Dennos Museum Center, “It is a fine exhibition to offer during our 15th anniversary year and a great opportunity for students to encounter one the great figurative sculptors of all time during our traditional school field trip season.”
The exhibition is courtesy of the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, which provided the collection. The Dennos is open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 1-5 p.m. Admission is $4 adults, $2 for children and free to museum members.
For more information on the museum go to www.dennosmuseum.org or call 231-995-1055. The Dennos is located at the entrance to Northwestern Michigan College.
 
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