Letters

Letters 07-27-2015

Next For Brownfields In regard to your recent piece on brownfield redevelopment in TC, the Randolph Street project appears to be proceeding without receiving its requested $600k in brownfield funding from the county. In response to this, the mayor is quoted as saying that the developer bought the property prior to performing an environmental assessment and had little choice but to now build it...

Defending Our Freedom This is in response to Sally MacFarlane Neal’s recent letter, “War Machines for Family Entertainment.” Wake Up! Make no mistake about it, we are at war! Even though the idiot we have for a president won’t accept the fact because he believes we can negotiate with Iran, etc., ISIS and their like make it very clear they intend to destroy the free world as we know it. If you take notice of the way are constantly destroying their own people, is that living...

What Is Far Left? Columnist Steve Tuttle, who so many lambaste as a liberal, considers Sen. Sanders a far out liberal “nearly invisible from the middle.” Has the middle really shifted that far right? Sanders has opposed endless war and the Patriot Act. Does Mr. Tuttle believe most of our citizens praise our wars and the positive results we have achieved from them? Is supporting endless war or giving up our civil liberties middle of the road...

Parking Corrected Stephen Tuttle commented on parking in the July 13 Northern Express. As Director of the Traverse City Downtown Development Authority, I feel compelled to address a couple key issues. But first, I acknowledge that  there is some consternation about parking downtown. As more people come downtown served by less parking, the pressure on what parking we have increases. Downtown serves a county with a population of 90,000 and plays host to over three million visitors annually...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Rodin
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Rodin

- May 11th, 2006
Master of human expression strides through the Dennos
When one thinks of sculpture, one name towers above all others: Auguste Rodin is to bronze what William Shakespeare is to theatre or Robert Johnson is to the blues.
So a new exhibit, “Rodin: In His Own Words,” offers a rare chance to see the work of the French master of the human form at the Dennos Museum Center in Traverse City. The exhibit, which opened April 29 and runs through August 6, features 35 of the artist’s bronze sculptures in addition to a selection of his original letters and an explanation of the 10-step “lost-wax” casting process.
The exhibit spans the entire range of Rodin’s legacy from early works “The Mask of the Man with the Broken Nose” and “Saint John the Baptist Preaching,” to studies from some of Rodin’s major monuments such as “The Gates of Hell” and “The Burghers of Calais.” Also included are Rodin’s statues of the artists “Claude Lorrain” and “Jules Bastien-Lepage” from the heyday of the Parisian art scene.
At the peak of his career Auguste Rodin (1840–1917) was regarded as the greatest sculptor since Michelangelo. Leaving behind 19th-century academic traditions, Rodin created his own form of artistic expression. He focused on the vitality of the human spirit by using a vigorous modeling technique that emphasized his personal response to the tale being told. His works were purposely obscure in their meaning, allowing the viewer to bring his or her own imagination to bear in the story behind the work.
Today, Rodin’s pioneering figurative sculpture is considered a crucial link between traditional and modern art.
“We are very pleased bring this wonderful exhibition to the Grand Traverse region,” says Eugene Jenneman, Director of the Dennos Museum Center, “It is a fine exhibition to offer during our 15th anniversary year and a great opportunity for students to encounter one the great figurative sculptors of all time during our traditional school field trip season.”
The exhibition is courtesy of the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, which provided the collection. The Dennos is open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 1-5 p.m. Admission is $4 adults, $2 for children and free to museum members.
For more information on the museum go to www.dennosmuseum.org or call 231-995-1055. The Dennos is located at the entrance to Northwestern Michigan College.
 
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