Letters

Letters 02-15-2016

No More Balloon Launches In the recent Wedding issue, a writer noted a trend of celebratory balloon launches at weddings. Balloon releases are nothing more than a wind-born distribution of litter, not an appropriate way to celebrate a marriage or commemorate cancer victims and survivors...

Plenty Of Blame In Flint Many opinions have been voiced about the Flint water crisis; all have left many questions unasked, such as: Lead is the culprit, and a there is a ban on lead in paint, as well as one on lead in new plumbing materials. There are still many service connecting pipes made out of lead in service. Why? Have any been installed despite the ban?

Stop Balloon Releases I was appalled by the column on the wedding traditions article that suggested making new traditions like releasing balloons at the conclusion of the ceremony! I am the president of AFFEW (A Few Friends for the Environment of the World) in Ludington, and we clean beaches four times a year....

Roosevelt Had It Right 202 years ago the British Royal Navy bombarded Fort McHenry during the War Of 1812. While being held captive aboard the HMS Surprise, Francis Scott Key composed the immortal “Star Spangled Banner” poem. 202 years later I ask, “Oh, say can you see” one of the most appallingly dishonest presidential election cycles since the Adams/Jefferson election of 1800...

Avoid Urban Sprawl In Petoskey I urge Resort Township, the City of Petoskey and Emmet County to dissuade Bay Harbor’s proposal to add new business and residential development along U.S. 31 near the main entrance to Bay Harbor...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Rodin
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Rodin

- May 11th, 2006
Master of human expression strides through the Dennos
When one thinks of sculpture, one name towers above all others: Auguste Rodin is to bronze what William Shakespeare is to theatre or Robert Johnson is to the blues.
So a new exhibit, “Rodin: In His Own Words,” offers a rare chance to see the work of the French master of the human form at the Dennos Museum Center in Traverse City. The exhibit, which opened April 29 and runs through August 6, features 35 of the artist’s bronze sculptures in addition to a selection of his original letters and an explanation of the 10-step “lost-wax” casting process.
The exhibit spans the entire range of Rodin’s legacy from early works “The Mask of the Man with the Broken Nose” and “Saint John the Baptist Preaching,” to studies from some of Rodin’s major monuments such as “The Gates of Hell” and “The Burghers of Calais.” Also included are Rodin’s statues of the artists “Claude Lorrain” and “Jules Bastien-Lepage” from the heyday of the Parisian art scene.
At the peak of his career Auguste Rodin (1840–1917) was regarded as the greatest sculptor since Michelangelo. Leaving behind 19th-century academic traditions, Rodin created his own form of artistic expression. He focused on the vitality of the human spirit by using a vigorous modeling technique that emphasized his personal response to the tale being told. His works were purposely obscure in their meaning, allowing the viewer to bring his or her own imagination to bear in the story behind the work.
Today, Rodin’s pioneering figurative sculpture is considered a crucial link between traditional and modern art.
“We are very pleased bring this wonderful exhibition to the Grand Traverse region,” says Eugene Jenneman, Director of the Dennos Museum Center, “It is a fine exhibition to offer during our 15th anniversary year and a great opportunity for students to encounter one the great figurative sculptors of all time during our traditional school field trip season.”
The exhibition is courtesy of the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, which provided the collection. The Dennos is open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 1-5 p.m. Admission is $4 adults, $2 for children and free to museum members.
For more information on the museum go to www.dennosmuseum.org or call 231-995-1055. The Dennos is located at the entrance to Northwestern Michigan College.
 
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