Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Music · A Band Called Hursh
. . . .

A Band Called Hursh

Eric Pokoyoway - July 27th, 2006
Ben Hursh never really had an interest in playing the guitar, but when he found himself on the wrong end of a bad break-up, he felt inspired.
“I think I only knew four chords at the time, but I was with this girl for five years and she ripped me up and down,” Hursh said.
Hursh, 28, met his former sweetheart at 16. When they separated, he borrowed his uncle’s vintage Gibson and began teaching himself to play, sing, and write music.
“We were the perfect couple; we were even talking about marriage. Then she started her first semester at Western Michigan University and decided she wanted to study abroad.”
That’s when they went their separate ways and he needed a way to get his problems out. “Instead of just sitting around thinking about how much it sucked, I decided to play the guitar. I just didn’t have anything better to do except drink and play guitar.”

SELF EXPRESSION
By keeping busy with his uncle’s guitar, he started writing songs that others could relate to. It was an easy way for him to express himself and talk about things that were bothering him, Hursh said.
“Guys don’t talk about their problems or moods; this was an acceptable way for me to get things out, and people were looking up to me because I was writing things they liked. The best way to get over a girl is singing to another girl.”
With the help of his mom and dad, Rebecca and Guy Hursh, Ben formed the band, Hursh, in 2005. Rebecca sings back-up and Guy is the lead guitarist. They added bass player Rob Ackley, traditional drummer Devon Neibert, and conga player Keith Ballmer, completing the six-member gang. Last spring they released their first album.
Ben Hursh had some exposure to music prior to his break-up. Guy Hursh had been playing the guitar since he was 16, and Rebecca could commonly be heard singing as she took care of her three sons and two daughters.
“When Ben was a kid, his brothers and sisters would beg me to play ‘Rocky Raccoon’ by The Beatles and ‘Four Wet Pigs’ by Greg Brown,” Guy Hursh said.
Music was always in the Hursh house.
“Some of my youngest memories were at home with my mom playing John Mellencamp, while we danced around just being little kids,” Ben Hursh said.

MOSTLY ORIGINALS
Hursh is a blue-collar band drawing influences from Ryan Adams, Bruce Springsteen and The Rolling Stones. They play mostly original songs written by Ben and Guy.
“Sometimes you see these bands, and they just become bar bands. We don’t want to be that, we just want to stay true to our music.” Ben Hursh said.
They do play some covers by Ryan Adams and The Rolling Stones, but they put their own twist on them, Guy Hursh said.
“This band is all about that guy [Adams], he writes the kind of music that inspires people,” Ben Hursh said.
This is a hard-working band that plays until 2 p.m. and wakes up early for work the next day, Ben Hursh said. Guy Hursh is a construction worker for the Leelanau County Road Commission while Ackley is a commercial painter who works primarily in Leelanau County and the Grand Traverse Area. Ben works for the Sutons Bay Department of Public Works. “We aren’t full-time musicians, we all get up at the

butt-crack of dawn and go to work, which
is what this band is kind of about,” Ben
Hursh said.
“This band is an outlet for people who bust their ass for eight-plus hours every day.”

MORE TUNES
Hursh is already working on another album. This CD is going to be more upbeat. They haven’t recorded anything yet, but Ben and Guy have been working on some new stuff with the help of Ackley.
“This first batch of songs Ben wrote, he was in Kalamazoo and was still drawing on those experiences,” Guy Hursh said. “The stuff that we are working on is more of a collaboration between Ben, Rob and myself.”
Ben Hursh now also has a lot more positive things to write about because of his new baby girl and his fiancé. He met Tricia Ponder outside of Jacob’s Well.
Well, with a mouthful of Skittles.
“I tried to meet her outside when she was leaving and had bought a some Skittles at a candy machine while I waited for her,” he said. “It was just one of those things when she came out right when I had popped them in my mouth.”
Because of the Skittles, Ben Hursh had a difficult time talking to her. Yet somehow, things worked out romantically.

Hursh plays on Friday nights at 10:30 p.m. at Le Naro Pub in Lake Leelanau. They will also be at Pete’s Pub in Traverse City July 29 and August 23 at Music in the Park in Elberta. Hursh’s self-titled album is on sale at cdbaby.com and at Horizon Books.

 
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