Letters

Letters 04-14-14

Benishek Inching

Regarding “Benishek No Environmentalist” I agree with Mr. Powell’s letter to the editor/ opinion of Congressman Dan Benishek’s poor environmental record and his penchant for putting corporate interests ahead of his constituents’...

Climate Change Warning

Currently there are three assaults on climate change. The first is on the integrity of the scientists who support human activity in climate change. Second is that humans are not capable of affecting the climate...

Fed Up About Roads

It has gotten to the point where I cringe when I have to drive around this area. There are areas in Traverse City that look like a war zone. When you have to spend more time viewing potholes instead on concentrating on the road, accidents are bound to happen...

Don’t Blame the IRS

I have not heard much about the reason for the IRS getting itself entangled with the scrutiny of certain conservative 501(c) groups (not for profit) seeking tax exemption. Groups seeking tax relief must be organizations that are operated “primarily for the purpose of bringing about civic betterment and social improvements.”


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Book Roundup

Robert Downes - April 12th, 2007
Self-publishing has become a cottage industry in Northern Michigan with a slew of do-it-yourself authors making their mark on the literary world.
Here’s an update on who’s doing what on the shelves of local bookstores, borrowing freely from the authors’ press releases:

Murder in the Keweenaw
By Harley Sachs

Author Harley Sachs has contributed many articles to the Northern Express through the years, writing both about life in the Upper Peninsula and for the paper’s “Technology” column.
As a summer resident of Houghton and a former instructor at Michigan Technological University, Sachs is well-grounded in his subjects. Fans of his articles may be interested to know that this is his 12th novel in a sideline that varies from science fiction to mysteries.
“Murder in the Keweenaw” is a textbook whodunnit involving a fisherman who’s angling for a sturgeon on Lake Michigan with a Barracuda lure. Instead, he dredges up a waterlogged body from Superior’s depths.
From there, the book progresses with dashes of Sachs’ madcap sense of humor, insider’s take on the U.P., and nuggets of information on everything from the immigrant Finns to the habits of pike, and the hazards of entanglement with Internet porn.
Sachs’ books are offered through an “on-demand” book publisher and can be previewed and ordered through
www.lulu.com.
The Perception Experiment
By Jason Glover

Youthful ambitions unfold in a sci-fi setting with religious overtones in Jason Glover’s first novel, which the 24-year-old author promises is groundbreaking.
And so it is, because the book is a roman a clef about Glover himself, who has published a “mind-bending and experimental work of literature” in keeping with his day job as editor and publisher of the arts-oriented Thirdeye Magazine.
“No, it’s not another local book on quaint life in Northern Michigan,” he writes. “It’s a poetic and imaginative novel aimed and shaking the very foundation of your world-view from its moorings.”
“This is my effort to explain myself. To explain how I view the world,” Glover says of his quasi-autobiography. “But, instead of writing a collection of essays, I turned my philosophical outlook into a fictitious psychological thrill-ride.”
The plot: In a squeaky-clean town in a world of mandatory mind control, one man decides to challenge his world-view by skipping church on Sunday. All hell breaks lose as the moralizing pillars of the community try to stop the hero’s “full-fledged battle for sanity.”
Teaser quote: “Now they’re coming for him, to put him back in his place, restore his status as a sedated slave.”
Check out Glover’s book-signing events in this issue’s “Hot Dates” section, on page 24.
Barns of Old Mission Peninsula and Their Stories
by Evelyn Johnson

Evelyn Johnson earned a Merit Award in 2006 from the Historical Society of Michigan for her book, which tells the story of 104 old barns on Mission Peninsula in photos and prose.
Her self-published book became something of a runaway bestseller, prompting its re-release through Book Marketing Solutions (BMS) in Traverse City.
Johnson began her journey in 1995 when she relocated to Old Mission and became infatuated with the structures. She began interviewing owners and documenting the stories of 104 barns located on the historic peninsula.
“I knew each family had a history and a story to tell,” she recalls. “I wanted others to know, my grandchildren included, that a part of who we are today comes from someone whose roots were firmly planted on a farmland where they always had a barn.”
The first-time author originally self-published the book with the help of her husband. Within four months, she had sold all 1,000 copies. “I was in a panic. An AP article about the book was picked-up by newspapers across Michigan. We had hundreds of orders for books and no books until we connected with BMS to publish the revised edition.”
Now her book is back on store shelves in time for the summer tourist mash. For a preview, visit www.readingup.com.
















Self-publishing has become a cottage industry in Northern Michigan with a slew of do-it-yourself authors making their mark on the literary world.
Here’s an update on who’s doing what on the shelves of local bookstores, borrowing freely from the authors’ press releases:

Murder in the Keweenaw
By Harley Sachs

Author Harley Sachs has contributed many articles to the Northern Express through the years, writing both about life in the Upper Peninsula and for the paper’s “Technology” column.
As a summer resident of Houghton and a former instructor at Michigan Technological University, Sachs is well-grounded in his subjects. Fans of his articles may be interested to know that this is his 12th novel in a sideline that varies from science fiction to mysteries.
“Murder in the Keweenaw” is a textbook whodunnit involving a fisherman who’s angling for a sturgeon on Lake Michigan with a Barracuda lure. Instead, he dredges up a waterlogged body from Superior’s depths.
From there, the book progresses with dashes of Sachs’ madcap sense of humor, insider’s take on the U.P., and nuggets of information on everything from the immigrant Finns to the habits of pike, and the hazards of entanglement with Internet porn.
Sachs’ books are offered through an “on-demand” book publisher and can be previewed and ordered through
www.lulu.com.
The Perception Experiment
By Jason Glover

Youthful ambitions unfold in a sci-fi setting with religious overtones in Jason Glover’s first novel, which the 24-year-old author promises is groundbreaking.
And so it is, because the book is a roman a clef about Glover himself, who has published a “mind-bending and experimental work of literature” in keeping with his day job as editor and publisher of the arts-oriented Thirdeye Magazine.
“No, it’s not another local book on quaint life in Northern Michigan,” he writes. “It’s a poetic and imaginative novel aimed and shaking the very foundation of your world-view from its moorings.”
“This is my effort to explain myself. To explain how I view the world,” Glover says of his quasi-autobiography. “But, instead of writing a collection of essays, I turned my philosophical outlook into a fictitious psychological thrill-ride.”
The plot: In a squeaky-clean town in a world of mandatory mind control, one man decides to challenge his world-view by skipping church on Sunday. All hell breaks lose as the moralizing pillars of the community try to stop the hero’s “full-fledged battle for sanity.”
Teaser quote: “Now they’re coming for him, to put him back in his place, restore his status as a sedated slave.”
Check out Glover’s book-signing events in this issue’s “Hot Dates” section, on page 24.
Barns of Old Mission Peninsula and Their Stories
by Evelyn Johnson

Evelyn Johnson earned a Merit Award in 2006 from the Historical Society of Michigan for her book, which tells the story of 104 old barns on Mission Peninsula in photos and prose.
Her self-published book became something of a runaway bestseller, prompting its re-release through Book Marketing Solutions (BMS) in Traverse City.
Johnson began her journey in 1995 when she relocated to Old Mission and became infatuated with the structures. She began interviewing owners and documenting the stories of 104 barns located on the historic peninsula.
“I knew each family had a history and a story to tell,” she recalls. “I wanted others to know, my grandchildren included, that a part of who we are today comes from someone whose roots were firmly planted on a farmland where they always had a barn.”
The first-time author originally self-published the book with the help of her husband. Within four months, she had sold all 1,000 copies. “I was in a panic. An AP article about the book was picked-up by newspapers across Michigan. We had hundreds of orders for books and no books until we connected with BMS to publish the revised edition.”
Now her book is back on store shelves in time for the summer tourist mash. For a preview, visit www.readingup.com.



Off on a Great Lakes Adventure

Lucky author Jerry Dennis: he’s got a year of traveling ahead of him for a new book on the Great Lakes, and the project has already landed some whoppers -- not fish, but foundation grants.
Dennis will be researching “A Watcher on the Shore,” traveling around the Great Lakes with the goal of letting the world know “that they are priceless natural resources worth fighting to protect.”
“I want people worldwide to smell the water and feel the sand on their feet and hear the waves,” Dennis said. “I want them to think deeply and respond emotionally to what I write because they will then be more likely to contact their senators and representatives and go to the streets, if necessary, to express their outrage over environmental abuses.”
If anyone can do the job, it’s Dennis, an author based on Mission Peninsula who has written a number of books on natural history, the Great Lakes and the outdoors life, in addition to serving as a columnist and contributor for outdoor magazines such as Canoe.
Then too, his safari will be well-stocked with the kind of greenery it takes to keep even a non-environmentally-oriented writer inspired. The Water Studies Institute at Northwestern Michigan College connected Dennis with three major foundations to help fund his research, including the Wege Foundation ($50,000 over two years); the Great Lakes Fishery Trust ($40,000 over two years) and the W. K. Kellogg Foundation at $30,000. An additional $20,000 is being sought to complete the funding package.
“I was seeking support so I could devote all my energy to writing this book,” Dennis said in a release, adding that he will spend the year living on the coasts of all five Great Lakes. More good news: he has a commitment from St. Martin’s Press to publish his book when the research and writing wraps up.

































































 
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