Letters

Letters 09-07-2015

DEJA VUE Traverse City faces the same question as faced by Ann Arbor Township several years ago. A builder wanted to construct a 250-student Montessori school on 7.78 acres. The land was zoned for suburban residential use. The proposed school building was permissible as a “conditional use.”

The Court Overreached Believe it or not, everyone who disagrees with the court’s ruling on gay marriage isn’t a hateful bigot. Some of us believe the Supreme Court simply usurped the rule of law by legislating from the bench...

Some Diversity, Huh? Either I’ve been misled or misinformed about the greater Traverse City area. I thought that everyone there was so ‘all inclusive’ and open to other peoples’ opinions and, though one may disagree with said person, that person was entitled to their opinion(s)...

Defending Good People I was deeply saddened to read Colleen Smith’s letter [in Aug. 24 issue] regarding her boycott of the State Theater. I know both Derek and Brandon personally and cannot begin to understand how someone could express such contempt for them...

Not Fascinating I really don’t understand how you can name Jada Johnson a fascinating person by being a hunter. There are thousands of hunters all over the world, shooting by gun and also by arrow; why is she so special? All the other people listed were amazing...

Back to Mayberry A phrase that is often used to describe the amiable qualities that make Traverse City a great place to live is “small-town charm,” conjuring images of life in 1940s small-town America. Where everyone in Mayberry greets each other by name, job descriptions are simple enough for Sarah Palin to understand, and milk is delivered to your door...

Don’t Be Threatened The August 31 issue had 10 letters(!) blasting a recent writer for her stance on gay marriage and the State Theatre. That is overkill. Ms. Smith has a right to her opinion, a right to comment in an open forum such as Northern Express...

Treat The Sickness Thank you to Grant Parsons for the editorial exposing the uglier residual of the criminalizing of drug use. Clean now, I struggled with addiction for a good portion of my adult life. I’ve never sold drugs or committed a violent crime, but I’ve been arrested, jailed, and eventually imprisoned. This did nothing but perpetuate shame, alienation, loss and continued use...

About A Girl -- Not Consider your audience, Thomas Kachadurian (“About A Girl” column). Preachy opinion pieces don’t change people’s minds. Example: “My view on abortion changed…It might be time for the rest of the country to catch up.” Opinion pieces work best when engaging the reader, not directing the reader...

Disappointed I am disappointed with the tone of many of the August 31 responses to Colleen Smith’s Letter to the Editor from the previous week. I do not hold Ms. Smith’s opinion; however, if we live in a diverse community, by definition, people will hold different views, value different things, look and act different from one another...

Free Will To Love I want to start off by saying I love Northern Express. It is well written, unbiased and always a pleasure to read. I am sorry I missed last month’s article referred to in the Aug. 24 letter titled, “No More State Theater.”

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Mountains of Books for Great Summer Beach Reads

Nancy Sundstrom - June 12th, 2003
There are mountains of new books that look to be great summer beach reads, so as you start listing the reasons to look forward to summer or the plans you have for the season, sizzling summer books ought to at least make a decent showing.
No matter what genre you prefer, author you favor, or subject you want to immerse yourself in, summertime provides a near guarantee that you’ll find something to please your reading palate. Seasoned readers have been compiling their summertime wish list for some time now, based largely on anticipated new releases, and those choices are probably many and varied. Here’s a few of mine for the next few months, and I look forward to bringing you reviews of them in upcoming editions of Express.

Dry: A Memoir by Augusten Burroughs

After surviving James Frey’s powerful and harrowing “A Million Little Pieces,“ I thought it might be a while before I delved into an addiction saga again, but the buzz (no pun intended) for Burroughs’ latest has been so strong, that it looks like it shouldn’t be ignored. Burroughs is the author of the bestseller “Running With Scissors,“ and in this latest chronicle of his endlessly fascinating and sometimes heartbreaking life, he explains how he tried to “out-drink his memories, outlast his demons, and outrun his past.“ As an advertising executive in Manhattan, he becomes way-too-fond of drinking, and after landing in rehab (“where his dreams of group therapy with Robert Downey Jr. are immediately dashed by grim reality of fluorescent lighting and paper hospital slippers“), he has to return to his same drunken lifestyle, but do it dry. In this author’s hands, it promises to be quite a journey.

The Dirty Girls Social Club by Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez

A “Sex in the City“-styled tome that features six complicated Latina woman who are approaching 30, this debut novel from Valdes-Rodriguez follows in the footsteps of novels like “Bridget Jones’ Diary,“ meaning it’s a sure-fire hit among women of all ages. The story centers around the las sucias who have been inseparable since their days at Boston University almost ten years before, and form the Dirty Girls Social Club. The group provides them all with a lifeline of mutual support and admiration, no matter what fate befalls them, and apparently, there’s plenty of misadventures among the triumphs of everyday life.

Under the Banner of Heaven: A Story of Violent Faith by Jon Krakauer

Krakauer is the respected author of such outdoor-based books as “Eiger Dreams,“ “Into the Wild,“ and “Into Thin Air.“ His literary reputation rests on the insightful forays into lives conducted at fringe of extremes. In his latest, he moves to new territory in the extremes of religious belief within American borders. The book centers around a double murder committed by two Mormon Fundamentalist brothers, Ron and Dan Lafferty, who say they received a mandate from God to kill their innocent victims. In examining it, Krakauer constructs a “multilayered, bone-chilling narrative of messianic delusion, savage violence, polygamy, and unyielding faith,“ all of which sounds quite chilling. As part of the process of examining an offshoot of America’s fastest-growing religion, he raises questions about the nature of religious belief itself.

Getting Mother’s Body by Suzan-Lori Parks

Parks is a novelist, playwright, songwriter, and screenwriter who found time to write “Topdog/Underdog,“ the play that won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Clearly gifted and versatile, she has a staggering range of exciting projects on the horizon, now that she has completed this novel about Billy Beede, the teenage daughter of the “fast-running, no-account, and six-years-dead Willa Mae.“ One day, Billy receives a letter saying that Willa Mae’s burial spot in Arizona is about to become a grocery store, and as her only daughter, she has to take possession of the body, but in doing so, may also become the caretaker of a cache of jewels believe to be buried with her. Needless to say, all of the characters who knew Willa Mae also have a stake in finding out if the gems really exist, which sounds like great fodder, especiallay in the hands of such a talented and distinctive voice as Parks’. I, for one, can’t wait to see what she does next.

Sushi for Beginners by Marian Keyes

I’ll check out this one right after “Dirty Girls Social Club“ and right before “The Devil Wears Prada.“ Author Keyes is a phenomenally successful writer whose name alone guarantees sales, but the flip side of that coin is that she has a smart, funny, disarming style, even when cranking out what some might suspiciously view as “chick-lit.“ Her latest appears to stay within the parameters of her template for guilty pleasure reading, and in this outing, she follows three fabulous women on their search for happiness, and other fabulous things. I know, I know - Stephen Jay Gould this is not, but the potential here for a great beach read? Priceless.

Living History by Hillary Rodham Clinton

You can admit it. Aren’t you the least little bit curious about what Hillary’s reaction was to learning about hubby Bill’s dalliance with then-White House intern Monica Lewinsky? After all, we’ve heard everyone else (pretty much) give their side of events, why not those from the now-Senator from New York who some expect to make a Presidential run herself someday? Clinton has promised that this will be a no-holds barred accounting of her personal and political life, and if she delivers on that, this promises to be an honest and provocative memoir from one of the nation’s most respected and reviled women. The book, by the way, is due out this week, and one can expect a flood of media attention to accompany it.

 
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