Letters

Letters 12-14-2014

Come Together There is a time-honored war strategy known as “divide and conquer,” and never has it been more effective than now. The enemy is using it against us through television, internet and other social media. I opened a Facebook account a couple of years back to gain more entries in local contests. Since then I had fallen under its spell; I rushed into judgment on several social issues based on information found on those pages

Quiet The Phones! This weekend we attended two beautiful Christmas musical events and the enjoyment of both were significantly diminished by self-absorbed boors holding their stupid iPhones high overhead to capture extremely crucial and highly needed photos. We too own iPhones, but during a public concert we possess the decency and manners to leave them turned off and/or at home. Today’s performance, the annual Messiah Sing at Traverse City’s Central Methodist Church, was a new low: we watched as Mr. Self-Absorbed not only took several photos but then afterwards immediately posted them to his Facebook page. We were dumbfounded.

A Torturous Defense In defense of the C.I.A.’s use of torture in a mostly fruitless search for vital information, some suggest that the dire situation facing us after 9-11, justified the use of torture even at the expense of the potential loss of much of our nation’s moral authority.

Home · Articles · News · Art · The Ripple Effect
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The Ripple Effect

- June 28th, 2007
The glory of the Sleeping Bear National Lakeshore is revealed with maximum impact at the new Ripple Effect Studio and Gallery in the Village of Empire.
The gallery provides a summer worksite and exhibit space for acclaimed large format photogra-pher Jeff Ripple. A resident of Naples, Florida, the photographer has exhibited in more than a dozen solo and group museum exhibits, won numerous awards nationwide, and has authored nine books of natural history.
Ripple fell in love with Sleeping Bear Dunes and the Leelanau Peninsula after being married last year on Good Harbor Beach and spending the summer in the Empire area with his new wife, Pam Lincoln. The couple lived during the summer in a 23-foot travel trailer with their dog, Bear, outside Lincoln’s barn. “I was and remain constantly surprised and inspired by the drama of the skies over the lake and the gentle, rolling hills,” says Ripple. “This studio will allow me to produce new work with little or no interlude between exposing the film and making a print for exhibit.”
He spent the better part of five months scouring the national lakeshore for inspirational images and has opened the gallery with eight pieces from his series, “Wild Sleeping Bear,” in addition to images from his native Florida, Colorado, the Appalachians, and the Caribbean. He will unveil an additional four to six pieces from “Wild Sleeping Bear” within the next couple months, in addition to new oil and acrylic paintings inspired by the Leelanau County landscape, most of them painted on location en plein aire.
Ripple Effect Studio and Gallery is, as its name implies, the photographer’s summer working studio and a gallery showplace for his photographs, which range in size from a modest 11x14 inches to more than 38x60. The images reflect the artist’s devotion to protecting the natural environment, his fascination with the ephemeral play of light on textures and forms in the landscape, and his reverence for wild places. They are entirely wild landscapes, with little or no evidence of people or civilization. Ripple works in both color and black & white and is self-trained in large format photography and printmaking.

Ripple Effect Studio and Gallery is located at 10085 West Front Street in Empire and is open through the end of September, seven days a week and by appointment.
 
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