Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Region Watch · New rules for...
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New rules for anglers/Goodwill exits/Filmaking workshop/Leelanau bus

Katie Huston - July 5th, 2007
New rules for anglers
A foreign pathogen that causes fish to bleed internally will have a big impact on recreational anglers this summer.
Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS) is not a native disease to Michigan waters, but it was discovered in Lake Huron in 2005. Department of Natural Resources biologists believe the disease has also found its way into Lake Michigan. It has the potential to devastate entire fish populations.
To prevent the spread of VHS, anglers must make sure they do not release fish caught in VHS-infested waters into any waters that are listed as free of the disease. The transport of bait is prohibited, and anglers must make sure bait obtained in a VHS-positive area is only used on other VHS-positive areas.
“The invasion of exotic species is one of the gravest dangers facing the Great Lakes today,” said Jennifer McKay, a policy specialist at Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council in Petoskey. More than 180 invasive species have entered the Great Lakes since the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway and the Chicago Shipping Canal. Currently, a new invasive species enters the Great Lakes every eight months.

Goodwill exits
the Whiting Hotel
Goodwill Industries of Northern Michigan will stop providing services at the Whiting Hotel in downtown Traverse City at the end of September. Approximately 50 residents and 14 Goodwill employees will be affected by the decision.
The non-profit organization, which helps formerly incarcerated persons transition back into the community, is shutting down the program due to financial pressures. Changes and reductions in state funding have created higher program costs for case management and housing, which Goodwill cannot absorb without jeopardizing other services.
“Without adequate funding, we are unable to provide an appropriate level of service to effect a lasting and positive change in the lives of people the program was designed to help,” said executive director Cecil McNally.
McNally said Goodwill will help residents find
alternative housing, and work to place employees affected by the change. For more
information, visit:
www.goodwillnmi.org.
As for The Whiting, it’s getting a remake as a “boutique hotel,” catering to upscale visitors under the new ownership of Bob Sutherland of Glen Arbor’s Cherry Republic company.

Filmmaking workshop
The Traverse City Film Festival is accepting applications for its second annual student filmmakers workshop.
The free workshop will be taught by Oscar-winning filmmaker Michael Moore and Larry Charles, the director of last year’s hit comedy “Borat,” who will share tips and tricks of the trade and answer questions. Thirty students will be selected for the program, which is sponsored by the Herrington-Fitch Foundation.
Interested students should email their name, email address, phone number,
age, school name, and year of study to:
education@traversecityfilmfestival.org by July 13, with the subject line “TCFF Student Workshop.”
Applicants should also include a one-page single-spaced essay addressing the following topics: why I would like to participate in the workshop, my interest in the film industry, and my experience in film.

Leelanau bus runs again
Leelanau County’s Summer Fun Ride will once again offer daily service from June 28 through Labor Day.
The bus, operated by the Bay Area Transportation Authority, offers four round trips every day between Leland and Northport, passing through Lake Leelanau, Suttons Bay, Peshawbestown and Omena. Passengers can also flag down a bus or request a stop at any safe place along the route.
Riding the bus costs $2 each way for adults, and $1 for seniors, children and people with disabilities. For complete schedule and route information, visit http://www.bata.net or call 231-941-2324.
 
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