Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Region Watch · New rules for...
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New rules for anglers/Goodwill exits/Filmaking workshop/Leelanau bus

Katie Huston - July 5th, 2007
New rules for anglers
A foreign pathogen that causes fish to bleed internally will have a big impact on recreational anglers this summer.
Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS) is not a native disease to Michigan waters, but it was discovered in Lake Huron in 2005. Department of Natural Resources biologists believe the disease has also found its way into Lake Michigan. It has the potential to devastate entire fish populations.
To prevent the spread of VHS, anglers must make sure they do not release fish caught in VHS-infested waters into any waters that are listed as free of the disease. The transport of bait is prohibited, and anglers must make sure bait obtained in a VHS-positive area is only used on other VHS-positive areas.
“The invasion of exotic species is one of the gravest dangers facing the Great Lakes today,” said Jennifer McKay, a policy specialist at Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council in Petoskey. More than 180 invasive species have entered the Great Lakes since the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway and the Chicago Shipping Canal. Currently, a new invasive species enters the Great Lakes every eight months.

Goodwill exits
the Whiting Hotel
Goodwill Industries of Northern Michigan will stop providing services at the Whiting Hotel in downtown Traverse City at the end of September. Approximately 50 residents and 14 Goodwill employees will be affected by the decision.
The non-profit organization, which helps formerly incarcerated persons transition back into the community, is shutting down the program due to financial pressures. Changes and reductions in state funding have created higher program costs for case management and housing, which Goodwill cannot absorb without jeopardizing other services.
“Without adequate funding, we are unable to provide an appropriate level of service to effect a lasting and positive change in the lives of people the program was designed to help,” said executive director Cecil McNally.
McNally said Goodwill will help residents find
alternative housing, and work to place employees affected by the change. For more
information, visit:
www.goodwillnmi.org.
As for The Whiting, it’s getting a remake as a “boutique hotel,” catering to upscale visitors under the new ownership of Bob Sutherland of Glen Arbor’s Cherry Republic company.

Filmmaking workshop
The Traverse City Film Festival is accepting applications for its second annual student filmmakers workshop.
The free workshop will be taught by Oscar-winning filmmaker Michael Moore and Larry Charles, the director of last year’s hit comedy “Borat,” who will share tips and tricks of the trade and answer questions. Thirty students will be selected for the program, which is sponsored by the Herrington-Fitch Foundation.
Interested students should email their name, email address, phone number,
age, school name, and year of study to:
education@traversecityfilmfestival.org by July 13, with the subject line “TCFF Student Workshop.”
Applicants should also include a one-page single-spaced essay addressing the following topics: why I would like to participate in the workshop, my interest in the film industry, and my experience in film.

Leelanau bus runs again
Leelanau County’s Summer Fun Ride will once again offer daily service from June 28 through Labor Day.
The bus, operated by the Bay Area Transportation Authority, offers four round trips every day between Leland and Northport, passing through Lake Leelanau, Suttons Bay, Peshawbestown and Omena. Passengers can also flag down a bus or request a stop at any safe place along the route.
Riding the bus costs $2 each way for adults, and $1 for seniors, children and people with disabilities. For complete schedule and route information, visit http://www.bata.net or call 231-941-2324.
 
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