Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

Home · Articles · News · Letters · Letters 7/5/07
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Letters 7/5/07

- July 5th, 2007
Disappearing wildlife
The birds in our yard totally disappeared when the intense, widespread spraying of pesticides began in 1999 after the first case of the West Nile Virus was discovered in New York. About three years after this particularly intense period of pesticide spraying, I started to see an occasional bird in our yard. This summer, after eight long years, I am now finally seeing a more normal number of birds around our home.
Prior to 1999, we had so many blue jays that I was beginning to consider them a nuisance. We had black-capped chickadees in our evergreens, nests of robins and cardinals, as well as bees and butterflies, but they
all disappeared -- our yard felt absolutely sterile.
The June 15 edition of the St. Paul Pioneer Press reports that the: “Audubon Society calls for quick action after finding stunning declines in 16 once-common species over the past 40 years.” Our birds have been disappearing for a long time. Yes, loss of habitat is a problem, but I believe our use of pesticides is an even bigger problem. According to www.wikipedia.org, pesticide use has increased 50-fold since 1950. The slow decline in our bird population parallels our increased use of pesticides.
National news recently reported honeybees are disappearing, which is a direct threat to our food supply. I believe our prolific use of pesticides, and other chemicals we pour on our lawns and golf courses, is the major cause of our disappearing wildlife. The more we use poisons in our environment, the more wildlife disappears.
The black-capped chickadee has not
returned to our yard yet, but I have hope that it will return again some day. For further
research see: www.mercola.com/2002/aug/31/west_nile.htm.

Mary Anderson • via email

No nudes is good nudes
We read with some interest the “All Natural” article by Rick Coates in your June 14-20 issue. Since Mr. Coates failed to contact us for a statement, we are curious as to how he arrived at his conclusion that we won’t take a position on the issue. For the record, we are opposed to designating an official nude beach anywhere in Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.
Mr. Kerwin is in error when he claims that there is no law against public nudity. In fact, Michigan Penal Code 750.335a prohibits indecent exposure, which includes public nudity. The Lakeshore has received numerous complaints about nudity at Otter Creek/Esch Beach, often from families who were upset that their children were “exposed” to nude strangers who were not at all discreet about it. Law-abiding park visitors have even been harassed by nudists in this location. The National Park Service will not tolerate this sort of behavior. We ask everyone who comes to enjoy the park’s beaches to display mutual respect toward other visitors, and this includes keeping your clothes on.

Dusty Shultz • Superintendent
Sleeping Bear Dunes
National Lakeshore

Fourth food for thought
In addition to Fourth of July, fireworks, flag waving, family picnics, and other deserved fun making, why not add a reading of the entire Declaration of Independence? It totals 1,340 words. It takes about 10 minutes for a thoughtful reading out loud to friends and family.
Reflect on what you know of the times and challenges that inspired the authors’ principles and their list of grievances. Ask yourselves “How does any of this relate to today?”
If you need help see: www.ushistory.org/declaration/ or a good history book.

Tom Shea • TC

Drugs or therapy?
Re: Recent articles in the Northern Express: “Present the Other Side,” “Are Our Kids Being Overdosed?” etc...
The letter written by a clinical therapist, “Present the Other Side,” drums up the notion that the head bone connected to the backbone, is a complicated organ and that “disorder“ (synonymous with with chaos, disarray, confusion, mess, muddle, turmoil, anarchy, and mayhem) exists within this organ.
The disease, (synonymous with illness, sickness, ailment, bug, virus, syndrome, malady, and noncoincidentally, disorder) is the manipulation of words to explain the neurological connections required to release the serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine (formed in nerve endings), including substances released by an organ, to another organ, which are stimulants to function by means of its chemical activity (a hormone) in response to a neurological synapse.
The quote, “often encouraged to first work in therapy“ (her specialty), proves the point of pretension.
There is an equal encouragement towards medication, as the statewide ratio of psychiatrists to psychologists within the CMH system is nine to one, (dis)respectively.
Do not be fooled. Counseling is a great choice! Chiropractors are too; so is acupuncture, meditation and prayer.
There are numerous choices when faced with significant emotional events causing neurological reactions in the human body and all of its organs (including language and its purpose) and there is no lifesaving or relationship-saving chemical concoction (temporary or permanent).
There is one book on this subject, it‘s called a dictionary. In his May 24 letter on “Overdosed Kids,“ Fred Baughman, M.D., is 100% correct in defining the neurology of mental health as opposed to the two-faced psychotropic intoxication/poisoning pharma-cartel.
Psychotropic is defined as: “causing changes in behavior or the functioning of the mind.“
The mind is defined as: “human consciousness that originates in the brain and is manifested in thought, memory, perception, feeling, will, or imagination.“
Dr. Baughman and myself are not the only ones with enough backbone to realize the giant sucking sound of taxpayers dollars delved into mental health systems.

Duane Fox • TC

Taxes on oil
Re: “The Euphoria of Rising Gas Prices,“ 6/21 by George Foster.
I’m glad you have seen the light. Maybe we have a chance to survive if more people follow your example. Taxes must be added to oil because if oil is not more expensive than alternative fuels, then alternative fuels will never be used.

Richard R Riker • Mackinaw City
 
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