Letters

Letters 12-14-2014

Come Together There is a time-honored war strategy known as “divide and conquer,” and never has it been more effective than now. The enemy is using it against us through television, internet and other social media. I opened a Facebook account a couple of years back to gain more entries in local contests. Since then I had fallen under its spell; I rushed into judgment on several social issues based on information found on those pages

Quiet The Phones! This weekend we attended two beautiful Christmas musical events and the enjoyment of both were significantly diminished by self-absorbed boors holding their stupid iPhones high overhead to capture extremely crucial and highly needed photos. We too own iPhones, but during a public concert we possess the decency and manners to leave them turned off and/or at home. Today’s performance, the annual Messiah Sing at Traverse City’s Central Methodist Church, was a new low: we watched as Mr. Self-Absorbed not only took several photos but then afterwards immediately posted them to his Facebook page. We were dumbfounded.

A Torturous Defense In defense of the C.I.A.’s use of torture in a mostly fruitless search for vital information, some suggest that the dire situation facing us after 9-11, justified the use of torture even at the expense of the potential loss of much of our nation’s moral authority.

Home · Articles · News · Letters · Letters 7/5/07
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Letters 7/5/07

- July 5th, 2007
Disappearing wildlife
The birds in our yard totally disappeared when the intense, widespread spraying of pesticides began in 1999 after the first case of the West Nile Virus was discovered in New York. About three years after this particularly intense period of pesticide spraying, I started to see an occasional bird in our yard. This summer, after eight long years, I am now finally seeing a more normal number of birds around our home.
Prior to 1999, we had so many blue jays that I was beginning to consider them a nuisance. We had black-capped chickadees in our evergreens, nests of robins and cardinals, as well as bees and butterflies, but they
all disappeared -- our yard felt absolutely sterile.
The June 15 edition of the St. Paul Pioneer Press reports that the: “Audubon Society calls for quick action after finding stunning declines in 16 once-common species over the past 40 years.” Our birds have been disappearing for a long time. Yes, loss of habitat is a problem, but I believe our use of pesticides is an even bigger problem. According to www.wikipedia.org, pesticide use has increased 50-fold since 1950. The slow decline in our bird population parallels our increased use of pesticides.
National news recently reported honeybees are disappearing, which is a direct threat to our food supply. I believe our prolific use of pesticides, and other chemicals we pour on our lawns and golf courses, is the major cause of our disappearing wildlife. The more we use poisons in our environment, the more wildlife disappears.
The black-capped chickadee has not
returned to our yard yet, but I have hope that it will return again some day. For further
research see: www.mercola.com/2002/aug/31/west_nile.htm.

Mary Anderson • via email

No nudes is good nudes
We read with some interest the “All Natural” article by Rick Coates in your June 14-20 issue. Since Mr. Coates failed to contact us for a statement, we are curious as to how he arrived at his conclusion that we won’t take a position on the issue. For the record, we are opposed to designating an official nude beach anywhere in Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.
Mr. Kerwin is in error when he claims that there is no law against public nudity. In fact, Michigan Penal Code 750.335a prohibits indecent exposure, which includes public nudity. The Lakeshore has received numerous complaints about nudity at Otter Creek/Esch Beach, often from families who were upset that their children were “exposed” to nude strangers who were not at all discreet about it. Law-abiding park visitors have even been harassed by nudists in this location. The National Park Service will not tolerate this sort of behavior. We ask everyone who comes to enjoy the park’s beaches to display mutual respect toward other visitors, and this includes keeping your clothes on.

Dusty Shultz • Superintendent
Sleeping Bear Dunes
National Lakeshore

Fourth food for thought
In addition to Fourth of July, fireworks, flag waving, family picnics, and other deserved fun making, why not add a reading of the entire Declaration of Independence? It totals 1,340 words. It takes about 10 minutes for a thoughtful reading out loud to friends and family.
Reflect on what you know of the times and challenges that inspired the authors’ principles and their list of grievances. Ask yourselves “How does any of this relate to today?”
If you need help see: www.ushistory.org/declaration/ or a good history book.

Tom Shea • TC

Drugs or therapy?
Re: Recent articles in the Northern Express: “Present the Other Side,” “Are Our Kids Being Overdosed?” etc...
The letter written by a clinical therapist, “Present the Other Side,” drums up the notion that the head bone connected to the backbone, is a complicated organ and that “disorder“ (synonymous with with chaos, disarray, confusion, mess, muddle, turmoil, anarchy, and mayhem) exists within this organ.
The disease, (synonymous with illness, sickness, ailment, bug, virus, syndrome, malady, and noncoincidentally, disorder) is the manipulation of words to explain the neurological connections required to release the serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine (formed in nerve endings), including substances released by an organ, to another organ, which are stimulants to function by means of its chemical activity (a hormone) in response to a neurological synapse.
The quote, “often encouraged to first work in therapy“ (her specialty), proves the point of pretension.
There is an equal encouragement towards medication, as the statewide ratio of psychiatrists to psychologists within the CMH system is nine to one, (dis)respectively.
Do not be fooled. Counseling is a great choice! Chiropractors are too; so is acupuncture, meditation and prayer.
There are numerous choices when faced with significant emotional events causing neurological reactions in the human body and all of its organs (including language and its purpose) and there is no lifesaving or relationship-saving chemical concoction (temporary or permanent).
There is one book on this subject, it‘s called a dictionary. In his May 24 letter on “Overdosed Kids,“ Fred Baughman, M.D., is 100% correct in defining the neurology of mental health as opposed to the two-faced psychotropic intoxication/poisoning pharma-cartel.
Psychotropic is defined as: “causing changes in behavior or the functioning of the mind.“
The mind is defined as: “human consciousness that originates in the brain and is manifested in thought, memory, perception, feeling, will, or imagination.“
Dr. Baughman and myself are not the only ones with enough backbone to realize the giant sucking sound of taxpayers dollars delved into mental health systems.

Duane Fox • TC

Taxes on oil
Re: “The Euphoria of Rising Gas Prices,“ 6/21 by George Foster.
I’m glad you have seen the light. Maybe we have a chance to survive if more people follow your example. Taxes must be added to oil because if oil is not more expensive than alternative fuels, then alternative fuels will never be used.

Richard R Riker • Mackinaw City
 
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