Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · On the road, revisited
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On the road, revisited

Robert Downes - July 26th, 2007
On the Road, Revisited
I’m always amazed by how many high school and college students have read “On the Road” by Jack Kerouac. The rambling, stream-of-consciousness book celebrates its 50th anniversary this September.
Of course, these young people tend to be those who enjoyed studying literature in school. But still, it seems pretty cool that “On the Road” still has some legs 50 years after it was written.
I read “On the Road” three times at a similar age, from 17 to 19, and couldn’t make a lick of sense of it. It’s America’s version of James Joyce’s “Ulysses,” which is a completely unreadable book about a single day’s events in Dublin.
“On the Road” is much the same. It’s basically an autobiography of Jack Kerouac’s seven years of bumming around America in the 1940s in search of a new “hip” way of life, inspired by poetry, jazz, drugs, casual sex, and living rough on the streets.
Give it credit, the book provided a sequel to the ending of “Huckleberry Finn,” with its impulse to head west into the great unknown of America’s underground. It spurred a generation of young Americans to take up the travel lifestyle. God knows how many copies of “On the Road” are floating around Afghanistan today, left there 40 years ago by idealistic young American backpackers following the “Hippie Trail” to India.
Practically everyone has heard of “On the Road,” yet I imagine that few have had the fortitude to wade through its dense, ricochetting prose, which was meant to copy the be-bop rhythms of jazz. So here’s the gist of it -- the Cliff Sticky Notes version, if you will.
The book’s narrator is Sal Paradise (a stand-in for Kerouac), who worships Dean Moriarty. “Dean” is the real-life Neal Cassady, whose sex & drugs exploits with Ken Kesey’s Merry Pranksters and the hippies were further chronicled in “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test” by Tom Wolfe. Another character is Carlo Marx, a pseudonym for the poet Allen Ginsberg. Famous beatniks, writers and poets are sprinkled throughout the book under other guises.
Sal Paradise worships Dean Moriarty because this “son of a wino” and “sideburned hero of the snowy West“ is a modern-day outlaw, living outside the “square” world. “Dean set a Denver record for stealing cars, gunning for girls coming out of high school in the afternoon, driving them out to the mountains, making them, and coming back to sleep in any available hotel bathtub in town,” Kerouac writes.
Dean spends most of the book trying to nail high school girls as he rambles around the country, stealing cars and surviving on petty theft and crappy day jobs. He speaks a form of hipstereze along the lines of “Dig it, daddy-o,” that seems corny today.
He and Sal bounce from one sordid situation to another, trying to break free of the uptight side of America while exploring the hipster underground occupied by cool “spades,” jazz musicians and Mexicans. They are the prototypical beatniks, and out of their writings and experience comes the Beat Generation, which in turn, played midwife to the Swinging Sixties.
It’s an odd book, because although he was married a couple of times, Kerouac and his pals were notoriously bisexual, or gay in Ginsberg’s case. Yet much of the book is about their burning lust for “making” chicks. Yet, the unspoken subtext of the book is that Sal is in love with Dean. The result is a psychosexual circus that gives “On the Road” much of its power.
The book also purports to celebrate the nonstop good times of life on the road, but ultimately, it‘s a sad, unhappy book with a theme of disillusionment. Like Dorothy, Sal learns that there‘s “no place like home.“
After a few years of rambling, Sal starts to sour on the life of a bum and the fact that he’s always letting people down, including the women unlucky enough to live with him. After the book reaches a crescendo with a trip to Mexico City, Sal is deserted by Dean in Mexico. Dean abandons him, even though Sal is sick with dysentery, fever and hallucinations. “When I got better I realized what a rat he was,” Sal reflects.
The book peters out from there. A year later, Dean rides the rails from San Francisco to New York to make up with Sal. But Sal has a Duke Ellington concert to go to and no time for his old friend -- the bloom is off the rose. Dean simply turns around and heads back out West into the great unknown. The book ends with Sal sitting on an East River pier, looking at the sunset and moping about his old pal, Dean. All that’s missing is a rose to sniff.
According to legend, “On the Road” was written in three weeks of nonstop typing on a single roll of paper. But, as noted in an article on Wikipedia, much of the novel was written in advance on notepads during Kerouac’s travels. He also spent years of rewriting and self-censoring to keep his nervous publishers happy.
Kerouac claimed that the true ending of “On the Road” was eaten by his cocker spaniel. He also had to tone down the language and use fake names. This year, Viking Press plans to publish Kerouac’s original uncensored version of “On the Road.” The book is also being made into a movie.
Bitter irony: Kerouac died in Orlando, Florida in 1969 -- a place that was soon to become one of the most uphip towns in America. He was 46 years old.
Are you going to read the uncensored version of “On the Road” when it comes out? Me neither. But the movie, that should be a trip.
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