Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Art · The art of the guitar
. . . .

The art of the guitar

Carina Hume - August 9th, 2007
Clay piggy bank artist Tyler Bier and girlfriend Anna Farrell have collaborated to offer a line of colorful, handmade, clay guitars at the Bier Art Gallery and Pottery Studio. A variety of mini guitar replicas are available for purchase, and a demonstration of the artists’ creative process will take place on Saturday, Aug. 11 at the gallery, located six miles south of Charlevoix.

FAMILY TIES
The son of Ray and Tami Bier, owners of the Bier Art Gallery, Tyler has been working with clay for the last seven years.
“I started making piggy banks after my grandpa passed away, when I was about 13,” says the 20-year-old. Tyler Bier spent many years watching his grandpa on the potter’s wheel, but credits his parents for his clay skills. Ray is known for his functional stoneware pottery, while Tami creates whimsical and detailed clay sculpture as well as stoneware.
The gallery is housed in a converted red and white schoolhouse on US-31 that showcases a mixture of regional and national artists’ work in pottery, glass, wood, photography and more.

A COLLABORATION
Dating since high school, Tyler and Anna decided to combine their artistic skills to create something new. “My parents were encouraging us to do something for the gallery because Anna’s good at art,” says Tyler.
The result is an impressive display of one-of-a-kind clay guitars, over a foot high and more than four inches wide. The couple sold three in their first month, with prices ranging from $165 to $195.
A guitarist in the Charlevoix-based band Painting Tradition since he was a freshman in high school, Bier admits the clay pieces are modeled after some of his own guitars.
“I own probably six guitars,” says Tyler, “so we looked at those and made our guitars after them.”

ARTISTRY TAKES TIME
Creating a clay guitar piece takes eight hours, but combined with glaze and two firings, the finished project takes two weeks.
“They’re all slab built,” explains Tyler. “It’s really time consuming. We roll out slabs of clay, then cut out shapes of guitars, put them together, fire them, glaze them, fire them once more, then string them.” Copper speaker wire is used for each guitar’s strings.
Special orders are always welcome for those wanting mini replicas of their own guitars. Just bring a picture for the artists to create from.

A FUTURE IN THE ARTS?
Bier Art Gallery will host a demonstration day on Saturday, Aug. 11 from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. to coincide with Charlevoix’s Waterfront Art Fair. Tyler and Anna, as well as other artists represented by the gallery, will be on hand to explain their work. Tyler has been participating and demonstrating his clay work for demonstration days since his early teens.
Clearly, art is a part of Tyler’s and Anna’s lives, but they’re not sure how much of a role it will play in their futures. Tyler is a junior business major at Grand Valley State University and Farrell will be joining him there as a freshman this fall, but neither have decided on specific career paths.
“Art is fun,” Tyler says with a laugh. “We’ll see how it goes.”

Bier Art Gallery and Pottery Studio is located six miles south of Charlevoix on US-31 and is open daily from 10a.m.-6p.m. or by appointment.
Call 231-547-2288, 866-880-5624 or
visit www.biergallery.com for more information.



 
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