Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Before the Mighty Mac
. . . .

Before the Mighty Mac

Len Barnes - August 30th, 2007
As we enter Fischer’s Happy Hour Tavern near Northport, our eyes are drawn to the large picture showing the Straits of Mackinac, with a line of cars in the foreground snaking around to get on the ferry to the Upper Peninsula.
The picture is titled “The Deer Hunters’ Lineup,” describing the three-mile long traffic jam in the days before the Mackinac Bridge opened 50 years ago in 1957.
Back then, the only way to and from Michigan’s Upper Peninsula was by auto ferry, including the long-gone ship, City of Petoskey.
In the 1930s and ‘40s, my family rode up from Cadillac in a large Reo automobile, with plenty of room for five of us and a large trunk for the spare tire and other essentials. There was no air conditioning and waiting in line could be very hot, but with the windows cranked down, the breeze from the water was nice. We inched forward for five hours or so before getting on the boat, and it wasn’t unusual for Dad to have to walk to get some extra gas. Once we got on the boat we could walk out on deck and watch the waves.
Once in St. Ignace, we would go to the home of Auntie Erick’s and her son Oscar to stay a few days, with my dad taking me to an area near Lake Michigan where we could shoot off some fireworks on the Fourth of July. I shot off a rocket, which backfired and hit my left hand, that still bears the mark.
Oscar went to the bank one day and withdrew all of his mother’s savings. He got on the ferry and went downstate. My father sued the bank for Auntie Erick’s money, but the U.S. senator from that region interfered and she didn’t get anything back, despite my dad’s efforts on her behalf.
Even though they had to cross the Straits by ferry, many people went to the U.P. for recreation and to see the beautiful Copper Harbor and Eagle Harbor areas. My wife, Ellen, remembers a trip with her family in 1948 to see the Tahquamenon Falls and the Brockway Mountain Drive, but doesn’t have a memory of the ferry ride at all.
My late friend John Voelker hated the bridge and the loss of the isolation he so enjoyed, and there are undoubtedly others who also feel that way, but the bridge opened up scenic wonders for many who didn’t have the leisure time that we experienced in the ‘30s and ‘40s, when travel was at a much slower pace.

The annual Mackinac Bridge Walk takes place Monday, Sept. 3, starting at 7 p.m. in St. Ignace. This is the 50th anniversary of the bridge. For complete info on the walk, see www.mackinacbridge.org
 
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