Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · A journey through war &...
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A journey through war & peace

Robert Downes - September 13th, 2007
We tend to shy away from reviewing self-published books at the Express, because generally, they are - how you say? Not so good.
But there’s a poignancy to the story of Father Walter Marek that tugs at the heartstrings on almost every page of his memoir: “Cache the Czech -- A Divine Journey to America.”
It’s a small, plain-spoken book -- just 99 pages -- but its 89-year-old author weaves a tumultuous tale from simple threads as he takes us on a journey through war and peace. As a young man, he lived through the invasion of Czechoslovakia by Nazi Germany, and then through the occupation of his country by the Soviet Union. The book tells of his calling as a Catholic priest and subsequent escape from the Communist secret police, narrowly escaping possible torture and execution. It tells how he made his way to America as a refugee priest to make a new life in western Michigan.
Some of you oldsters may remember Father Marek; he spent five years in Traverse City in the mid-1950s. This is where the blessings of peace came to bear in his life. Inspired by the example of the music camp at Interlochen, he became one of the founders of the Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp near Muskegon, and also the Czech Music Camp for Youth in his native country.
What gives Fr. Marek’s book its power is its juxtaposition of good and evil, often on the same page. The story opens with sunny memories of his childhood in the small town of Horni Jeleni (“Upper Elk Country”), Czechoslovakia. The town of 2,000 had three general stores which were renowned for roasting coffee. But when the Communists took over, even small town coffee roasters feared for their lives: “I can still smell the heavenly aroma of roasting coffee beans and see the streets of our little town...,” Marek writes. “... I sometimes wonder what happened to such companies during the Communist occupation, when almost all company owners were banished from their businesses, imprisoned or killed. Those who joined the Communist Party were lucky just to stay alive and have menial work.”
As a youth, Marek recalls that anti-Semitic views were common in Czechoslovakia, with ugly Jewish stereotypes taught in his elementary school education by Jesuit teachers.
Yet during seminary school, he found that even Catholic priests were targets of first the Nazis and then the Communists. Some of his teachers and fellow students were tortured and murdered by the Nazis at a “model” concentration camp, set up to impress the Red Cross.
He notes that Hitler’s reign of terror went far beyond persecuting the Jews. “Czechs commonly believed that Hitler planned to resettle the whole nation, some 10 million souls, to Siberia. Today, we know that he could have accomplished this using cattle cars as he did with the Jews. Most Catholic priests believed that Hitler intended to erase the Catholic Church and all priests from Europe.”
After the Nazis fell, one evil was replaced by another. The Communists confiscated all private property and shipped many professionals and members of the middle class off to labor camps from which they never returned. Father Marek got involved with the resistance movement of the Czech underground, but it was dangerous work, owing to constant spying by informers and the
confessions of others under torture.
You didn’t want to get caught: “Conditions in Communist prisons were particularly cruel and the guards were known for their utter brutality,” he writes. “Communist prison guards routinely forced old and sickly priests to stand outside in the cold and completely disrobe.Sometimes they were forced to stand at attention for hours or until they fell. People have asked me, ‘Who was worse, the Nazis or the Communists?’ Such inhumanity has no Earthly measure.”
One day, the secret police came for Father Marek in what was likely to be a one-way ticket to a labor camp and the grave. He offered them some liquor and casually told them he needed to go downstairs to get his clothes. He slipped out a back door into the winter cold, grabbed the janitor’s old coat and hat from a utility room, and fled into the night.
Father Marek eventually made his way to Germany through the Czech underground, living in refugee camps until an opening arose in the diocese serving Northern Michigan. The book has a happy ending: his love of music has since touched the lives of thousands of children through two camps dedicated to the arts. As one of the last members of “the greatest generation” who lived through one of the darkest times in modern history, his story reminds us that life is a coin with two sides -- good and evil. Who knows which way it will flip?

“Cache the Czech“ is available for $9.99 through SMDBooks@excite.com, a publisher based in Traverse City. Or, request a copy at your local bookstore.
 
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