Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · Learning to love nature
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Learning to love nature

Robert Downes - September 27th, 2007
The mice were quite inconsiderate at our cottage this year.
For starters, four of them had the poor taste to die under our bathroom sink cabinet, creating a stink like rancid gym socks (only far worse). I pried a board off the cabinet and found them all dried out in there. One got stuck in the vacuum cleaner hose, glaring defiantly with his little dead mousie eyes.
They also chewed up a bunch of stuff: a box of Kleenex was shredded for bedding and they gnawed a hole through a vinyl/canvas car top that was stored out in the garage. They chewed a hole in an expensive sail. Who would do such a thing?
Although we’d never seen a single mouse in the cottage for the 10 years that we’ve been there, several of them decided to show up for a big party at the beginning of the summer, being so bold as to run around on the kitchen counter just as the guests were arriving. My wife caught two of them under a pan lid, which were subsequently transported 200 yards into the woods for release.
I’m not keen on killing anything -- even a mouse -- but enough was enough. In the past, I had used some poison PlayDough-type substance. The label claimed that the mice would nibble on this stuff and then get deliriously thirsty and go outside to die. My son pointed out, however, that it was probably better just to set traps because then they don’t even know what hit them, dying with a pleasant whiff of peanut butter in their snouts. After some reflection, I decided that he was right; better a little ultraviolence to whack the mice into the next world than slow death by poison.
Anyway, it all goes to prove it’s the law of the jungle out there.
Take trees, for instance.
I’ve been a tree-hugger since the time I was a twig, but owning a cottage in the woods has taught me that trees can be rather hostile individuals over the long haul.
We’re not talking about a few trees surrounding a home, like in your typical neighborhood. Our cottage was built over 50 years ago and is overshadowed by numerous maples, oaks and pines more than 100 feet tall, just a pebble toss from several acres of woods. Those trees throw a lot of biological litter, humidity and bugs our way. Tons, in fact.
Several years ago, I spent $800 to repair our garage roof, which had gone as squishy as a wet paper bag due to the slow influence of the overhanging trees. Between the shade and the ceaseless litter of pine needles and oak leaves, an invincible carpet of moss and lichens invaded the roof, creeping under the shingles and rotting out the underlying wood.
Bugs, mosquitoes and spiders? If you want extras to go around, take care to ring your home with plenty of trees.
For years, I wondered why in the world anyone would be crazy enough to want a lawn around their home. After all, you’ve got to mow a lawn -- it’s a big, time-consuming pain. But owning a cottage in the woods finally enlightened me on that score. Lawns were invented to keep those house-wrecking, bug-generating trees at bay.
But how can you not love a tree? Trees are keeping us alive on this planet, generating oxygen and doing their bit against global warming. They suck up CO2 as part of their natural respiration (although they also give off methane -- a greenhouse gas). Some scientists feel we need to plant billions of trees if we’re going to survive. I still love trees. But at a distance.

 
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