Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Features · Marking history in Emmet...
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Marking history in Emmet County

Sandy Bradshaw - September 27th, 2007
A perfect side outing while driving through beautiful Northern Michigan during a fall color tour is to watch for historical markers. It’s interesting to note that Michigan has more than 2,000 historical markers located throughout the state, and they prove to be just as educational for the adults as for any children you might have in tow. The program was started in 1955 and is one of the largest privately funded programs in the nation; the markers contribute to communities by offering information about notable sites of importance.
Markers can be a structure, a natural geographic area, or any other unusual or significant site. Before a marker can be placed on any given site, the site must be approved to be listed on the State Register of Historic Sites. After approval, a sponsor or committee must submit a plan and contact the Bureau of History. Once approval is granted, the sponsor must submit proposed text for the marker, plus, of course, a check to pay for it, although the final text is determined by the Bureau. Once everything is in place, a dedication ceremony is planned. There are five types of markers permitted, but any free-standing marker must have text on both sides, either the same or continuing text. It’s an interesting way to make any travels of the area an impromptu history lesson, as well.
Some of Emmet County’s most interesting Historic Marker Sites include the following:

Stafford’s Bay View Inn
Located on U.S. 31 north in historic Bay View and constructed by J.W. Howard, this inn was first known as the Woodland Avenue House in 1887, and later the Howard House. In 1923 it was renamed the Roselawn in honor of Hiram Rose, local pioneer and entrepreneur. He renamed it the Bay View Inn, and later it became Stafford’s Bay View Inn. Its continuous operation in Bay View fits in nicely with that cultural and educational center founded in 1875 as a tent community.
Bliss Pioneer Memorial Church
Organized in 1880, the East Bliss United Brethren Church was dedicated in 1903. It was disbanded in 1949, purchased by former members, and renamed as Bliss Pioneer Memorial Church. Located on Sturgeon Bay, west of Pleasantview Road, the church still holds regular Memorial Day services.

Pioneer Picnic Park
Located on Round Lake, also known as Lark’s Lake, it was created in 1915 as a memorial to the settlers of Northern Emmet County, and was deeded over to the County in 1950.

The Ephraim Shay House
Located at Main and Judd Streets in Harbor Springs, this hexagonal building is made of metal, and is an easy standout among the more traditional homes in the town. Ephraim Shay invented the Shay locomotive, a prominent feature in logging and mining operations.

Andrew J. Blackbird Museum
Andrew J. Blackbird’s former house, located on Main Street in Harbor Springs, is now a museum. It was constructed around 1868 and was the home of Chief Blackbird, who served as the town’s first postmaster. Blackbird wrote two books on Indian language and legends, one of which is a continuous best seller at the History Museum. Located next to the Shay house (see above), the museum has its own intriguing marker, which is in English on one side and is translated into the Native American Odawa language on the other.

Passenger Pigeons marker
Passenger pigeons are now extinct, yet they once flocked in the millions in Northern Michigan. A marker in their honor is located one mile west of Oden on U.S. 31 North, at the State of Michigan fish hatchery. The Little Traverse Historical Society also has an in-depth wing dedicated to the passenger pigeon, explaining how such a populous bird came to be extinct.

Fort Michilimackinac at Mackinaw City
Built by the French in 1715. British troops entered the Fort in 1761, but were routed by the Chippewa Indians in 1763. The British, however, moved to Mackinac Island in 1781. The Fort is located in Mackinaw City.

Little Traverse Bay
Yes, the bay has its very own marker – and offers incredibly panoramic views of the bay from Sunset Park, located on Petoskey’s U.S. 31.

St. Francis Solanus Mission
Located on West Lake Street in Petoskey, is believed to be the oldest building in Petoskey; it was built during the term of Bishop Baraga, who founded the area’s Indian mission.

Legs Inn
Located in Cross Village, Legs Inn is one of the most recent Northern Michigan locations to receive its own historical marker. This unusual restaurant was created by Stanley Smolak, a Polish immigrant, who combined European and American Indian cultures to great effect, and decorated the outside edge of his building’s roof with an assortment of inverted stove legs, hence the inn’s name. The specialty of the house, of course, is authentic Polish cuisine. The inn’s interior features unique driftwood carvings, tree root sculptures, and thick timber beams, and the lakeside vantage point - complete with garden in the back - provides clear views of the neighboring islands.

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