Letters

Letters 09-29-2014

Benishek Doesn’t Understand

Congressman Benishek claims to understand the needs of families, yet he wants to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which would cause about 10 million people to lose their health insurance. He must think as long as families can hold fundraisers they don’t need insurance...

(Un)Truth In Advertising

Constant political candidate ads on TV are getting to be too much to bear 45 days before the election...

Rare Tuttle Rebuttal

Finally, I disagree with Stephen Tuttle. His “Cherry Bomb” column in the 8/4/14 issue totally dismayed me. I always love his wit and the slamming of the 1 percent. His use of fact and hyperbole highlights the truth; until “Cherry Bomb.” Oh man, Stephen...

Say No To Fluoride

Do you or your child’s teeth have white, yellow, orange, brown, stains, spots, streaks, cloudy splotches or pitting? If so, you may be among millions of Americans who now have a condition called dental fluorosis...

Questions Of Freedom

The administration’s “Affordable Health Care Act” has ordered religious orders to provide contraception and chemical abortions against the church’s God given beliefs and teachings … an interesting order, considering the First Amendment’s clear prohibitions...

Stop The Insults & Talk

I found it interesting that Ms. Minervini used the Northern Express to push the Safe Harbor agenda for a 90-bed homeless shelter in Traverse City with a tactic that is also being utilized by members of the city commission. Those of us who oppose the project are being labeled as uncompassionate citizens...

Roads and Republicans

Each time you hit a road crater while driving, thank the “nerd” and the Tea Party controlled Republican legislature.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Where‘s the trophy?
. . . .

Where‘s the trophy?

Mark Waggener - February 8th, 2007
After two more soldiers were recently killed in Iraq from rocket-propelled grenades (RPGs), and with another 20,000 troops on their way to the region, you have to question the U.S. Army’s decision not to deploy a proven defense system called Trophy.
Trophy destroys RPGs by intercepting them away from a targeted vehicle. From anti-tank guided missiles to RPGs, fighting vehicles and soldiers remain at risk, and have taken many casualties due to these weapons. For over 16 months, military commanders in Iraq have urgently requested help from the Pentagon to defend against these attacks.
The Trophy system was developed in Israel by Rafael Armament Development Authority, and is a proven active-protection system. The system combines smart detection and advanced hard-kill technology that neutralizes what were once threats, by creating an impenetrable shield around fighting vehicles.
When a rocket or missile enters Trophy’s radar layer, the system detects, tracks and classifies the threat. If the vehicle is about to be hit, a hard-kill mechanism is activated and neutralizes or detonates the incoming weapons in mid air with virtually no residual effects.
Trophy maintains full kill performance even while on the move, and provides 360 degree protection. Because this high tech system is capable of neutralizing most missiles without detonation, it’s believed that soldiers within close proximity of the engagement would rarely incur injury.
According to Greg Gant of the Defense News: “...the army is passing up on Trophy to pursue an alternative system that won’t be fielded until 2011 or later.”
How many more casualties can we expect in the next four years that could be prevented with a proven system such as Trophy, and what kind of message is this sending to our troops in Iraq and Afghanistan?
The Israeli military has lost a number of tanks and troops due to RPGs, and is currently deploying the Trophy system with a 90% kill probability. Officials from the Pentagon’s Office of Force Transformation went to Israel and tested the Trophy defense system more than 30 times, and found it to be more than 98% effective in destroying RPGs. They purchased several Trophy systems at a cost of $300,000 to $400,000 each and planned on testing them on the battlefield in Iraq.
Critics claim that the entire project was scrapped by the U.S. Army without legitimate reasoning. The hierarchy in the Army claims that Trophy has not demonstrated its capability successfully, and does not have an automatic reload in place, which could put troops in jeopardy during the reloading process.
This is far from the truth, according to Israeli officials. Colonel Didi Ben Yoash, who helped develop Trophy, claims that auto-reload is intact and fully operational, and he is confident that this system can save lives.
The Army’s claim was also disputed by Pentagon officials in a document obtained through a network news organization. An e-mail from a senior official in the Pentagon stated: “Trophy is a system that is ready today. We need to get this capability into the hands of our war fighters ASAP, because it will save lives”.
The U.S. Army, using the buddy system, recently awarded a $70 million defense contract to Raytheon Corporation to develop similar weaponry. Colonel Donald Kotchman is in charge of the program and considers the Israeli system a threat to the Army’s program to develop its own RPG system from scratch. If the Trophy proved to be effective, then the Army would have no reason to go forward with the Raytheon system, and might have to terminate it. A technical team was appointed to evaluate competing RPG defense systems, and nine of the 21-person team happened to work for Raytheon. They ultimately concluded that their system was the best, even though it would not be operational until 2011.










 
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