Letters

Letters 07-25-2016

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Where‘s the trophy?
. . . .

Where‘s the trophy?

Mark Waggener - February 8th, 2007
After two more soldiers were recently killed in Iraq from rocket-propelled grenades (RPGs), and with another 20,000 troops on their way to the region, you have to question the U.S. Army’s decision not to deploy a proven defense system called Trophy.
Trophy destroys RPGs by intercepting them away from a targeted vehicle. From anti-tank guided missiles to RPGs, fighting vehicles and soldiers remain at risk, and have taken many casualties due to these weapons. For over 16 months, military commanders in Iraq have urgently requested help from the Pentagon to defend against these attacks.
The Trophy system was developed in Israel by Rafael Armament Development Authority, and is a proven active-protection system. The system combines smart detection and advanced hard-kill technology that neutralizes what were once threats, by creating an impenetrable shield around fighting vehicles.
When a rocket or missile enters Trophy’s radar layer, the system detects, tracks and classifies the threat. If the vehicle is about to be hit, a hard-kill mechanism is activated and neutralizes or detonates the incoming weapons in mid air with virtually no residual effects.
Trophy maintains full kill performance even while on the move, and provides 360 degree protection. Because this high tech system is capable of neutralizing most missiles without detonation, it’s believed that soldiers within close proximity of the engagement would rarely incur injury.
According to Greg Gant of the Defense News: “...the army is passing up on Trophy to pursue an alternative system that won’t be fielded until 2011 or later.”
How many more casualties can we expect in the next four years that could be prevented with a proven system such as Trophy, and what kind of message is this sending to our troops in Iraq and Afghanistan?
The Israeli military has lost a number of tanks and troops due to RPGs, and is currently deploying the Trophy system with a 90% kill probability. Officials from the Pentagon’s Office of Force Transformation went to Israel and tested the Trophy defense system more than 30 times, and found it to be more than 98% effective in destroying RPGs. They purchased several Trophy systems at a cost of $300,000 to $400,000 each and planned on testing them on the battlefield in Iraq.
Critics claim that the entire project was scrapped by the U.S. Army without legitimate reasoning. The hierarchy in the Army claims that Trophy has not demonstrated its capability successfully, and does not have an automatic reload in place, which could put troops in jeopardy during the reloading process.
This is far from the truth, according to Israeli officials. Colonel Didi Ben Yoash, who helped develop Trophy, claims that auto-reload is intact and fully operational, and he is confident that this system can save lives.
The Army’s claim was also disputed by Pentagon officials in a document obtained through a network news organization. An e-mail from a senior official in the Pentagon stated: “Trophy is a system that is ready today. We need to get this capability into the hands of our war fighters ASAP, because it will save lives”.
The U.S. Army, using the buddy system, recently awarded a $70 million defense contract to Raytheon Corporation to develop similar weaponry. Colonel Donald Kotchman is in charge of the program and considers the Israeli system a threat to the Army’s program to develop its own RPG system from scratch. If the Trophy proved to be effective, then the Army would have no reason to go forward with the Raytheon system, and might have to terminate it. A technical team was appointed to evaluate competing RPG defense systems, and nine of the 21-person team happened to work for Raytheon. They ultimately concluded that their system was the best, even though it would not be operational until 2011.










 
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