Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Night Work
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Night Work

Glen Young - October 25th, 2007
Way out East, in Cottekill, New York, author Steve Hamilton is likely sitting down, even tonight, to begin his new novel.
Hamilton, a Michigan native who has called New York’s Catskills Mountain region home since his 1983 graduation from U of M, is well known to Michigan mystery fans. Since the early success of 1998’s “A Cold Day in Paradise,” Hamilton has penned six other novels starring retired Detroit policeman Alex McKnight. But his most recent success finds Hamilton leaving McKnight and Paradise behind for his adopted home of New York.
“Night Work” marks a breakout for Hamilton; a first commercial departure from his tried and tested fictional series. This time, instead of the slushy confines of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula in winter, Hamilton’s story takes place in the Hudson River valley region of New York, near his own home. It’s a murder mystery in which the main character struggles both to exonerate himself and catch the killer.
Hamilton, who earned an Edgar Award for his first McKnight effort, says the new book required him to rethink the lessons he has learned writing about Michigan. “I learned a lot about how to write, I hope, but I was really trying to forget about it,” he says. “I wanted to put it aside for awhile, to prove to myself I could do it,” he says about breaking away from McKnight.
McKnight and the new novel’s protagonist, Joe Trumbull, are different characters, Hamilton believes, though they do share some similarities. “Circumstances have isolated them,” he believes. “Alex lives in a cabin, and Joe dives into his work in response to the isolation.” For Hamilton, however, the primary difference seems to come down to something more elusive. “Joe just sounds different in my head. Alex is a solid rock of a guy. Joe is a little more out there, a little more high strung,” he says.
“Night Work,” released recently by Hamilton’s long time publisher Thomas Dunne Books, may mark a departure, but don’t look for Hamilton to forego a return to Alex McKnight and the Paradise series. In fact, Hamilton hopes to be in the Upper Peninsula this winter, helping to bring McKnight to theaters. He has been collaborating with independent filmmaker Nick Childs on an adaptation of the second Alex McKnight mystery, “Winter of the Wolf Moon.” Childs’ film “The Shovel,” based on one of Hamilton’s short stories, earned the Best Narrative Short award at the 2006 Tribeca Film Festival.
Childs had never visited the U.P. before, but after Hamilton helped him scout locations, the director decided he wants to film at least some of the film in the region. Filming could take place soon after the first snowfall.
“This is not a Holly-wood studio taking it away from you,” Hamilton says. He says that he and Childs have worked on the screenplay together, and that while this is the first time he has worked with a collaborator, the process has been completely “egoless.”
Collaborating or not, Hamilton has found a successful formula for writing. When working out a new book, Hamilton gives small portions to two long-time associates from his original writer’s group. “They don’t care if I’ve published books or won awards,” he says. If the work is not up to acceptable standards, his two friends will “pre-destroy everything I do,” he laughs, “If it gets through them, it will work for anybody.”
This formula has definitely worked for Hamilton. In addition to the early Edgar Award, he received a 2006 Michigan Author Award. “It was like the whole state was calling me back to tell me I was doing something good,” he remembers.
His recent barnstorming promotional tour included a few Michigan stops, where Hamilton says he always finds he is appreciated, though it was not always so. “It took Michigan a while to catch on,” he says of the early feedback on the McKnight characters. Michigan readers are now among his most loyal.
Hamilton says it will not be long before he begins his next book, though he admits he is not sure what the new novel will be.
“It won’t be another Joe,” he says, “and Alex is not ready to come back yet, either,” he continues. In fact, Hamilton is considering a totally different approach at some point in the foreseeable future. “I might be ready to write about a criminal,” he says. He thinks he might try writing one book featuring “a guy who’s not necessarily someone you’d want to be like.”
Regardless of what the next book turns out to be, Hamilton is certain he will eventually return to his first Paradise and McKnight. “I want to find out what (Alex) is going to do next,” he admits.

Find out where to get “Night Work,” and find out more about Hamilton’s other works at www.authorstevehamilton.com.




 
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