Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Region Watch · It‘s time to party
. . . .

It‘s time to party

Rick Coates - September 28th, 2006
On Saturday, October 7, Goodwill
Industries will host their third annual “THE PARTY” a “fun-raiser,” as they bill it, to benefit their Goodwill Inn Homeless Shelter program.
While Northern Michigan is perceived as an affluent part of the state and the region lacks many people
living on the streets, THE PARTY organizers point to the growing homeless community as an “invisible” reality of the area.
“I am constantly educating my friends and clients,” said organizer and hair salon owner Heidi Hallett-Treece. “There are several misconceptions and myths in our community about who is homeless and why people are homeless. So often, first-time volunteers to the shelter are shocked that families with small children and even babies, in our community with so much wealth, find themselves homeless.”
Proceeds from the event will benefit incidental items and expenses that are needed for the new multi-million dollar Goodwill Homeless Shelter scheduled to open November 19.
“We are not raising money for the building cost. They have a capital campaign for that,” said Hallett-Treece. “As one member on our committee said, this is about ‘toothpaste and toilet paper.’ It is about food or doctor bills. Those everyday expenses that most of us take for granted.”
Last year‘s event raised $28,000 and had about 250 attendees. This year’s party will take place at the hanger at Harbor Air and event organizers hope that more people will attend as space is plentiful and the event is priced right.
“One thing we wanted to do was keep this affordable. So many fundraisers are out of reach for so many that live here. You pay $150 a ticket and then you are expected to buy at the auction. Add in a cash bar and a babysitter and the fact that there are fundraisers going on all the time it makes it difficult,” said Hallet-Treece. “Last year we received so many comments from participants that it was so nice to have a cross-section of the community represented in both age and socio-economic backgrounds.”
Despite the $30 ticket price organizers say that participants have been pleased with the “high-scale” atmosphere of the event.
“First, this is a casual affair. People come dressed comfortable even in jeans,” said Hallet-Treece. “The food is exquisite. It is from Grandview Catering and it is served butler-style so that adds some class to the event. It is a cocktail environment, not a sit-down, so people are able to socialize and move around. Plus we have a great dance band in Due North.”
Hallett-Treece became involved with Goodwill several years ago after answering a newspaper ad asking for volunteers.
“I felt blessed and I think lot of people in our community I wanted to give back,” said Hallett-Treece. “As I looked around I saw organizations like the Women’s Resource Center and Father Fred with large voices in the community and a lot of support. So when I saw the ad for Goodwill I said to myself, I don’t hear much about them, and I was certainly unaware at the time that we had an issue with people being homeless.”
A common question Hallett-Treece gets from friends and others is, “aren’t these people taking advantage of the system, just looking for a handout?”
“Sure, you always have people looking to take advantage of the system. In fact, there are those that are well off taking advantage of the system. But my faith tells me that I am not to be the judge of that. God calls on me and I believe all of us to help those in need and we have a lot of people in this community that are in need,” said Hallett-Treece. “So I give, others give, and we don’t ask questions or place judgments on those that we are helping. If they are using the system then there is a higher power they will answer too. I encourage anyone to volunteer at the shelter and hear the stories of those that have fallen victim to being homeless. It is not a picnic.”
She points to several myths and misconceptions of the homeless such as they are there by their own doing.
“Every story is different but in so many cases it has to do with the high cost of housing here. People can’t make their rent and pay all of their bills,” said Hallett-Treece. “In so many cases these are families with young children where a job has been lost and they don’t have family and friends to turn to. I have yet to meet anyone who wants to be homeless.”
When questioned as to why “the homeless” need a modern, state-of-the-art facility, the answer for Hallett-Treece is simple.
“Dignity,” said Hallett-Treece. “Everyone deserves dignity and the current facility does not promote a sense of self-worth. Those that come to us for help are down on their luck and need a boost and a lift. The new facility will be a start for those in need.”

THE PARTY is Saturday, October 7 from 7 pm to 11 pm at the Harbor Air Hangar, 1150 Airport Access, TC. Tickets are $30 and may be purchased at Floor Covering Brokers, Instant Framer, Pure Essence Salon and Goodwill or by calling 231-995-7701. To learn more about the new Goodwill Homeless Shelter visit www.goodwillnmi.org.
 
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