Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · Something?s Watching You
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Something?s Watching You

Harley L. Sachs - November 29th, 2007
Technology, like a ravenous wolf, is closing in on our heels. You’ve probably read about the cameras used at certain intersections to catch red light runners. These are not so unusual in states, unlike Michigan, where cars must carry a front license plate. Run a red light in some states and the camera gets your picture; the computer identifies your vehicle, and even if no one was around to see you, in a week or two you can expect a ticket and a hefty fine.
It seems like every time technology produces some new delightful gadget like the iPod, someone else finds a way to use it to intrude on your privacy and your life. Cell phones function as a locator. Otherwise the system wouldn’t know where you are. That’s great if you get lost in the woods or run off the road into a ravine and need to be found, and it’s also helpful in cases of crime; but how do you feel about this stealthy tracking going on during your everyday life?
In the case of the Glasgow, Scotland terrorists who tried to blow up the airport, the police found a cell phone used by one of the three men. The cell phone had a record of numbers called. One of those numbers was that of a co–conspirator. Within hours the police found the registration of the car he owned, tracked his cell phone, set up a road block on the motorway and flagged him down. And he thought he was home free.
The cell phone is not an anonymous gadget. Every call is recorded, where it came from, who was called, and the duration of the call. Homeland Security people, who have a reported list of 750,000 people on their roster of potential terrorists, have access to that kind of information.
Hey, if you don’t like that, did you vote for those people?
In a past column I wrote about those little gadgets that, mounted under your license plate, can record your passage through a toll gate so you can pass right through without stopping. The toll is then charged to your credit card. On the Indiana Toll Road, when the card that you picked up at the entrance is turned in at the exit, the average speed you traveled is calculated. If you were speeding, you get a ticket, along with the toll fee. Some speeding drivers take a half hour break for coffee at a rest stop just for insurance.
I once hitched a ride with a trucker whose boss had an engine hours meter installed to make sure the driver didn’t just park someplace and take a nap. The driver drove the truck up against a barrier, set the brake, and left the engine running while he went into a café.
Other gadgets aren’t that easy to deceive. Some car rental companies have locators built into the vehicles. It’s handy to find them in case they are stolen, a plus advertised by the OnStar folks. But if you rented a car for local use only and cross a state line or a national border, the record of the vehicle’s movements can stick you with a hefty penalty fee.
It’s only a matter of time before every car is equipped with a locator that not only notes the location but records your speed. Exceed the limit and get a ticket. No patrol car needed. If you have a teenaged driver, this might be a deterrent to street racing.
It could also catch a driver who, instead of driving to the stadium or the high school dance, took a detour to lover’s lane, spent three hours smooching, and never made it to the ball game.
It gets more and more like Orwell’s 1984, where you were watched by your television screen, or Zamyatin’s dystopian Russian novel, We, where everyone lived in glass houses in full view of the neighbors.
Are we ready for this? Or did technology, like the proverbial camel’s nose in the tent, wheedle into our lives until it took up our entire space?
 
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