Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Letters · Letters 11/29/07
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Letters 11/29/07

- November 29th, 2007
No Place For a Mine
The Department of Environmental Quaity comment period on Kennecott’s petition to open a metallic sulfide mine on the Yellow Dog Plains is now closed. However, I would like to share my concerns with you about this project.
First, this is no place for a mine. The headwaters of the Salmon Trout River, a pristine tributary of Lake Superior and home to endangered coaster brook trout is one of the worst places in Michigan, if not the world, to put a mine. Any mine. And to even consider a metallic sulfide mine operated by an EPA listed polluting foreign company is more than crazy. It’s criminal.
Second, while Michigan’s new mining law looks good on paper, it’s a facade. Deficiencies include: No siting criteria or water setbacks making any fragile environment a potential mine site. There is no monitoring along the transportation route. Local zoning control was taken away from governments and the people most affected. The rules are confusing, making the law difficult to enforce.
Third, the Kennecott application is flawed. Essential information on groundwater, surface water, discharge rate, transportation, and safety is missing from the application.
Fourth, this is our state land, not Kennecott’s. You don’t have to let them use it, so “takings” isn’t an issue. The payoff to the state of Michigan doesn’t add up. They get billions. We get few short term jobs, toxic waste dumps, polluted air and water, lower property values, health issues for citizens, and a trashed landscape no one wants to visit, ruining our vital tourism economy. Michigan is being treated like a third world country with state leaders looking on in assent.
In summary, Michigan, Water Wonderland of the U.S., has lost its way and you are leading us down the wrong path. No mine should be sited here, the mining law has no teeth, the application is flawed, and the people of Michigan lose.
We need state leaders to oppose this flawed project. If this mine is permitted on your watch our children and grandchildren will ask: What were you thinking? Think again, because it’s our land and our water.

Mattea Wellnitz • Rapid City

Good Work Nit-Picking
Regarding Rick Coates’ story on the State Theatre restoration and interview with Michael Moore - minor fact checking: the statement that Willow Run was making Jet fighters for WWII jumped off the page. It was B24 “Liberator” bombers, not jets. (Check on Wikipedia under “Willow Run.”)
Trivia: I haven’t tracked this down yet, but I’ve heard several stories that Willow Run not only ultimately produced a “bomber an hour,” but that they were fully armed, fueled and would roll out of the factory, test fire their guns into an embankment, then fly off to England.
As for the “can-do” attitude then vs. now, I’d have to ask about such things as lawyers, OSHA, and the maze of rules and regulations today. At least this project didn’t need an Environmental Impact Statement.
Oh yeah, and doesn’t deer season start on November 15th?
But enough nit picking.
Congratulations to Mike and all his helpers, financial and physical. With a special big thanks to the idea of theater etiquette!
For me, growing up in East Lansing, it was the State and Lucon theaters in East Lansing, and the Gladmer and the Grand Michigan Theater in Lansing.
And I heartily applaud redevelopment and re-use of existing facilities. Keep up the good work folks.

JT Hoagland • TC

Help Yourself to Health
Regarding healthcare, we need to do our part.
We need to begin to have discussions – unabashed, caring discussions.
On any given day, two thirds of high cost healthcare is related to the problems of long term abuse of the body – NOT because of unfortunate accidents or bad luck. The abuses I am referencing are to tobacco, food, alcohol, drugs, etc.
You may think I am talking about the extreme person. I am talking about our average, everyday citizen. Once the illnesses begin, they are repetitive, involve numerous hospital stays, and produce lingering, sub par lives. The medical technology and pharmaceutical industries have nicely developed ways to keep us alive.
Enough is enough. We need to have discussions with our physicians, someone, as to WHY we abuse ourselves – get down to the root of the problem early on. I appeal to the research community.
We blame the hospitals, physicians, for charging too much; however, we need to realize that WE are the primary problem. Eighty percent of the high cost healthcare is because of US. We expect everyone and everything to save us, take care of us when we get sick from our abuses. We need to change and do our part.
Think about this, be nice to our fellow man struggling with this, and do something.
Jill A. Bronkema • TC



 
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