Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Lighting up a village
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Lighting up a village

Danielle Horvath - December 13th, 2007
Can you picture the holidays with-out twinkling lights gracing the streets of your town? Well, Benzonia hasn’t had that treat for quite awhile. But thanks to the efforts of Marley Demers-Jablonski last year, the village of Benzonia put up holiday decorations for the first time in 20 years.
“I noticed a few years ago that all the other towns around had decorations, and Benzonia didn’t,” he explained. “It was very boring except for the big tree lit up in the park, so I started researching to see what was available.”

ORNAMENTAL RECYCLING
Marley began his quest to find decorations and quickly realized they were expensive to purchase at a whopping $500-600 each, so he came up with the idea to check with other towns to see if they had any old ones that they might donate. After many phone calls to area villages, Marley received responses back from Mancelona, Kaleva and Thompsonville last fall, which together donated 26 ornaments to his cause.
Marley was thrilled at the responses, and made arrangements to pick up the giant bells, wreaths and candle ornaments. Some were beyond repair, and some he donated to Cycle Moore in Interlochen for their annual holiday display. The next step was to get them up on the electric poles along the highway.

LIGHT WORK
The village of Benzonia was very supportive of Marley’s idea and worked with him to find a way to get the decorations up safely. Contacts were made to Consumer’s Energy, who helped them determine which poles had electrical outlets on them. Marley enlisted the help of family and friends and the village, and was able to get the giant balls, wreaths and ornaments to light up on 12 utility poles along
Main Street.
This year, Marley and other village residents would like to see all 28 poles lit. Unfortunately, only 11 of the 28 poles have outlets installed on them, and additional outlets cost $200 per pole. Marley, along with village residents and businesses, are working together to raise funds for the outlets on the other 17 poles. They have received donations of materials and labor to refurbish some of the decorations. Marley is looking forward to another season of helping light up his hometown.
For now, Marley is pleased with the results of his almost eight year quest.
“I think it’s great. They make it look more colorful. I hope we can get figure out a way to get them to all light up.”
My guess is he will. Happy Holidays.

 
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