Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · A kinder, gentler Super...
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A kinder, gentler Super Bowl

George Foster - January 28th, 2008
For those of you who love the Super Bowl exactly the way it is, you need not read further. For the rest of us, the Super Bowl is an innocent football game on steroids. Nothing symbolizes the excess of commercialization and celebrity hero-worship in this country more than the Super Bowl.
Yet, I love football – I played in high school and still follow the sport closely. I have viewed almost every Detroit Lions game since 1958. The NFL playoffs are can’t-miss TV viewing for me, as with other hard-core fans.
As you can see, I am dripping with credibility in the football-fan community – so hear me out. Instead of just complaining about the Super Bowl, these are my solutions to its problems cited below.

The Super Bowl is financially out of reach for the average person. I know it was 40 years ago, but many of us have memories of buying tickets at Tiger Stadium for 75 cents and pro basketball tickets at Cobo Arena in Detroit for $1. Fans of meager means could usually afford to buy the cheap seats in order to see the best athletes in the world.
The 2008 Super Bowl nosebleed tickets begin at about $3000. You will pay much, much more if you waited until recently to seek tickets. Expect to pay at least $100,000 (gulp) for executive suites for one lousy game – the Super Bowl. No one expects tickets to be a bargain, but these prices are obscene.
Of course, we live in an era where a football players can earn millions for sitting on the bench in a handful of games and NFL owners rake in billions during each football season. I’ll bet you are curious about the going rate for a 30-second TV ad during the Super Bowl this year. Ha, expect to cough up $3 million each for that privilege. No doubt about it, the Super Bowl has become the ultimate arena for the rich and famous.
Solution: why not give most of the Super Bowl tickets to underprivileged persons in the community hosting the game? Pro football is already earning hundreds of millions more than it needs outside of the Super Bowl. Such an act would be akin to Bill Gates donating some copies of his new MS Office software to the local library. Giving the tickets to charities would be a relatively low cost for providing immeasurable goodwill to the sport, if not our country.

The half-time show is easily the most obnoxious part of the Super Bowl. They are okay, but is anyone really looking forward to seeing Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers at halftime of the Super Bowl? If I hear Free Fallin’ one more time, I’m going to punch someone. And I Won’t Back Down. The fact that Janet Jackson’s wardrobe malfunction is the only interesting thing to happen in over 40 years of loud and glitzy halftime shows says it all.
A better way would be to televise the finals of the national Punt Pass and Kick competition at halftime. It would be tremendous thrill for the kids competing and more compelling viewing than one more recycled group of over-the-hill musicians.

Lastly, let’s change the damned name. The phrase “Super Bowl” even has an obnoxious, over-the-top ring to it. I hate it.
How about renaming it the “Pat Tillman Memorial Game?” As you may know, Pat Tillman is a former NFL star player who turned his back on millions in future earnings and a chance to play in the Super Bowl to enlist in the U.S. military. Killed in Afghanistan in 2004, Tillman is one of many who in recent years made the ultimate sacrifice for his country.
Commemorating Pat Tillman would help us place a completely different spin on what constitutes a hero. Then, in truth, maybe we could begin to claim pro football’s championship game to be super.



 
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