Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Justin Toomey Offers Unschooled Art...
. . . .

Justin Toomey Offers Unschooled Art with a Sense of Heart

Robert Downes - April 3rd, 2003
Northern Michigan‘s art scene often seems more intent on pleasing tourists than on making great statements or seeking new visions: paintings of old barns, sunsets, flowers and pastoral fields are as common as dandelions in local galleries.
But not so with the works of Justin Toomey, a young self-taught artist whose thought-provoking acrylic paintings will be exibited at Jacob‘s Well, a youth club in Traverse City, from April 7-30. Toomey‘s paintings are inspired by religion, conflict, the subsconscious, history, tragedy and love -- in short, many of the things that spark up the viewer‘s neurons to ponder the meaning of our time here on earth.
For instance, he‘s presently working on a painting, “Anthem of the Disabled“ about a paraplegic friend and the tragic accident which left her in a wheelchair. The painting captures the shock and pain of the event, while preserving the woman‘s keen sense of humanity. Another painting of a pig-headed, all-powerful being offers a jarring viewpoint on religion.
Toomey, 22, has had a life as unusual as his work. He is self-educated, for instance, in both the arts as well as the general sense.
“I had no formal education,“ he says. “I was pulled out of school when I was eight due to the high crime rate in Flint -- out of 300 kids in school, I was the only white student and I ran into problems. So I studied art, math and science at home on my own. There were no rules about it -- I‘m planning to get my GED, but I don‘t know if I need it. I have no urge to get accreditation.“
Lack of a formal education seems to have been no stumbling block for Toomey, who converses at a high level on the arts, history and other subjects. A sous chef at Lulu‘s Bistro in Bellaire, he‘s planning to go to northern Italy to live this fall to pursue his interest in art and history.
“I‘m really going for the experience,“ he says. “I want to see the death camps of Austria and Poland. I want to pay my respects -- there‘s a lot of history and disused energy there and I‘ve always been interested in history.“
Toomey took up painting four years ago after a long-time interest in doodling with a pen. Painting was a spontaneous thing that replaced a passion for mathematics and science. Today, he considers himself “more an expressionist than an artist“ and notes that “human triumph and failure are always good to take in“ as subjects.
Raised an atheist, Toomey has an outsider‘s interest in religion. “I‘m not myself an atheist, but I‘m not a Christian either,“ he says. “I‘ve been reading the Bible and there are a lot of metaphors in it. A lot of people take it as the literal truth, but you have to use it as lessons -- metaphors scrambled by man. In some ways, my paintings are trying to explain it better.“
When Toomey paints, he looks for undertones in his subject which give a clue to their experience, such as the knee surgery scar on a dancer. “I‘m looking for a little piece of their mentality,“ he says.
“I‘d like to go into fine art someday, but I need to know how to paint first,“ he adds. “Maybe someday I‘ll be a portrait artist. When I paint, people give me 50 percent of themselves and I give them 50 percent. A lot of artists paint people to thier likeness, but I look for something behind their eyes.“

Jacob‘s Well is located across from the Grand Traverse Civic Center near the corner of Front and Garfield. Justin Toomey will exhibit 15-20 of his paintings there from April 7-30.
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5