Letters

Letters 07-06-2015

Safety on the “Bridge to Nowhere” Grant Parsons wrote an articulate column in opposition to the proposed Traverse City pier at the mouth of the Boardman River. He cites issues such as limited access, lack of parking, increased congestion, environmental degradation, and pork barrel spending of tax dollars. I would add another to this list: public safety...

Vote Carefully A recent poll showed 84% of Michiganders support increasing Michigan’s renewable energy standard to at least 20% from the current 10%. Yet Representative Ray Franz has sponsored legislation to eliminate the standard. This out of touch position is reminiscent of Franz’s opposition to the Pure Michigan campaign and support for increased taxes on retirees....

Credit Where Credit Is Due I think you should do another article about the Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund giving proper credit to all involved, not just Tom Washington. Many others were just as involved...

I’ve Changed My Mind The Supreme Court has determined that states cannot keep same-sex couples from marrying and must recognize their unions. This has happened with breathtaking suddenness. It took 246 years for Americans to decide that slavery was wrong and abolish it, but it’s been only a couple of decades since any successful attempt was made to legalize same-sex marriage, and four years since a majority of the American public supported legalization...


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The real villains in baseball‘s drug scandal

George Foster - February 18th, 2008
The Real Villains in Baseball’s Drug Scandal
Roger lied. Or at least the chances are better than 50/50 that Clemens fibbed when he told a congressional committee that he never used steroids, HGH, or any other performance enhancing drugs.
Most baseball insiders estimate that 60% to 75% of Major League Baseball (MLB) players used banned drugs in some form at the height of their popularity several years ago. Even if Clemens never partook (though he sure looks guilty), the percentages indicate thousands of other MLB players cheated.
Steroid use by our society at large is obviously a big problem. To its credit, MLB has finally tightened down the rules and testing for drug use. Most of the players seem to have cleaned up their acts.
So, why is Congress hammering Roger Clemens until he tells us he is a lying drug abuser? Our representatives know it is impractical to nail hundreds of MLB players for past improprieties, so it continues to drag a few legends such as Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens through the mud. Congress wants us to think they are looking out for us.
Remember, the 109th Congress is the same outraged group that guaranteed they would begin to bring home our troops from Iraq, among other empty promises. Of course, the level of U.S. military there increased by about 25% after the 2006 elections. Congress continues to fund the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan (closing in on $1 trillion to date) with no end in sight.
Look, I am no fan of Clemens. His arrogant behavior on the field in the past is well documented. Besides, as possibly the greatest pitcher of all time, he overpowered my Detroit Tigers more times than I care to remember.
Yet, I am beginning to feel sorry for the guy. Roger Clemens has become the whipping boy for everything wrong in sports. When former MLB pitcher John Rocker accused his former team officials of showing players how to use steroids without being caught, he came the closest to identifying the real culprits of the drug scandal.
Remember how baseball was shaken to its foundations after the strike of 1994? MLB sat out August, September and the entire postseason of that year. The last time the World Series had been cancelled was 1904.
In 1995, avid fans were boycotting the game in droves and team owners were teetering on bankruptcy. Enter the drug era. Since then, in part because of the prodigious feats of Mark McGwire, Barry Bonds, and Roger Clemens (allegedly under the influence of steroids), baseball won back it fans and began to earn record profits. No wonder MLB officials were happy to look the other way while players used drugs like candy.
As national columnist Jason Whitlock stated, “We’ve mastered the art of incarcerating, belittling and disgracing drug users. We’ve shown little ability — and even less desire — to do anything to drug kingpins, the men who double their wealth by cultivating the drug market.”
It is too easy for our toothless Congress to beat up on celebrity players who broke the rules in order to perform at a high level and keep their jobs. Before you join the lynch mob, crucifying players for their horrible decisions, don’t forget to spread the blame.
It was the baseball owners who indirectly promoted and financed the illegal drug traffic in baseball. Maybe Congress should put them on the stand.
 
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