Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Books · Black Hole
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Black Hole

Robert Downes - February 18th, 2008
If you’ve never read a graphic novel before, then “Black Hole” by Charles Burns is a wake-up call as to how disturbing and provocative these steroid-packed comic books can be.
Hailed as the masterwork of a comics superstar, “Black Hole” is a frightening trip into a nightmare of teenage anxieties, rendered with drawings that recall the darkness of both Rembrandt and Dracula.
The story involves a bizarre plague that infects a group of teenagers in the Seattle area during the 1970s -- a time when “it wasn’t exactly cool to be a hippie any more, but David Bowie was still just a little too weird.”
The plague manifests itself as a disgusting mouth that opens on the victim’s neck, back or on the sole of the foot, saying bizarre things or revealing nightmarish visions. At times you don’t know if the teen characters are simply having nightmares about the agonizing experience of getting through high school, or if they’ve literally fallen into a black hole and are wandering in another dimension.
The untreatable illness is spread by sexual contact, and many of its victims are transformed into grotesque ghouls who live in a shabby camp in the forest where the kids party. The ghouls are apparently the alter-egos of the teens and how they feel about themselves. Characters sprout horns, shed their skins, and receive bizarre messages through cuts in the soles of their feet. Some of the geeks are recognizable as unpopular high school misfits -- fat kids, nerds and shy teens who don’t fit into any particular cliche. But there are also popular, good-looking teens -- such as the protagonist Chris -- who are drawn into the black hole.
Is the hole a gateway of depression and anxiety into adulthood through which every teenager must pass? Draw your own conclusions.
At any rate, once you’ve got the illness, there’s no going back.
“Burns ingeniously inhabits the minds of a group of brilliantly realized characters -- some who have it, some who don’t, some who are about to get it,” states press info accompanying the book. “What unfolds isn’t the expected battle to fight the plague... What we become witness to is a fascinating and eerie portrait of the nature of high school alienation itself -- the savagery, the cruelty, the relentless anxiety and ennui, the longing for escape.”
The novel is based on a comic book series that Burns began in 1994. He claims that the book is semi-autobiographical, based on growing up in Seattle in the 1970s.
Burns got his start as an artist working on Art Spiegelman’s “Raw” magazine in the 1980s and has since been involved in projects ranging from album covers for Iggy Pop to working on an ad campaign for Altoids.
There are a number of subplots in the novel, including Chris’s romance with Keith, the “nice, nice, super nice guy from biology class,” and her one-night stand with Rob, who infects her with the disease in a graveyard tryst. Then there’s a mysterious naked girl named Eliza who has a tail, a cat-faced killer who lives in the woods and parties with the teens, and the dark, surrealistic world of the ghouls.
Published by Pantheon Books, “Black Hole” has been hailed as a masterpiece of the graphic novel form by “The New York Times Book Review,” the “Boston Globe” and “Sci-Fi Magazine,” among others. For those readers who are still on the fence as to the cultural worth of graphic novels, consider that many are being made into noteworthy films, including “The 300,” “A History of Violence,” and the Batman saga, a cinematic character who was revived by “The Dark Knight” graphic novel series of the early ‘90s.
Often, “Black Hole” strays into the logic of a dream, where nothing seems to make sense, but then, that’s the power of this media, which marries pictures with prose in a way that has no limits to the imagination. This novel could never work as traditional prose because much of its power is dependent upon its horrifying images. Although the plot is difficult to follow at times, there’s no denying that “Black Hole” is a hard book to put down, and you may feel compelled to return to its pages again and again, if only for the incredible artistry of its drawings and the dread they inspire.
 
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