Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Region Watch · New Museum/Lights,...
. . . .

New Museum/Lights, Camera/New Heritage Route

Anne Stanton - March 17th, 2008
Look for a major new museum in Northern Michigan this summer when the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians opens the Eyaawing Museum & Cultural Center in Leelanau County.
“The creation of a Museum & Cultural Center has been a long-time vision of the Grand Traverse Band,” said Pat Putney, GTB Elders and cultural department manager.
The emphasis of the new museum will be on education and increasing the understanding and respect for the Grand Traverse Band’s vibrant culture, art, and history. Although the specific date when Eyaawing will be open to the public has not been set, construction is slated to be completed at the end of May.
The name Eyaawing was selected by tribal members. It translates as “Who we are” in Anishinaabemowin, the native language of the Grand Traverse Band and Michigan’s Anishinaabek.
In addition to telling the story of the Grand Traverse Band through various exhibits, the Eyaawing Museum will be a place where the traditions and language of the tribe will be kept, taught, and celebrated. Eyaawing’s programming will be twofold, with some programs designed specifically for tribal members and others designed to share the culture, language and spirit of the Grand Traverse Band with the public.
Eyaawing will focus on both the traditional and contemporary culture and history of the Grand Traverse Band and Michigan’s Anishinaabek. Critical to that saga is the long path that leads to the Grand Traverse Band’s recognition as a Native Sovereign Nation on May 27, 1980.
Eyaawing’s family-friendly, two-story design will overlook the West Grand Traverse Bay in the Village of Peshawbestown. The upper floor will house galleries, an audio/video viewing room, archives and study center and The Eyaawing Museum Store. On the ground floor, space is allocated for collections storage area, a work room, and classrooms.
The shoreline museum grounds will be an outdoor commons where the public will learn about the Anishinaabek’s traditional uses of plants.
The Eyaawing Museum Store will feature the work of tribal artists working in both traditional and contemporary media and themes. Other features will include educational materials for teachers, and books and recordings about the Grand Traverse Band’s and upper Great Lake‘s Anishinaabek culture and history.

LIGHTS, CAMERA,
ACTION FOR MICHIGAN
The Michigan Senate has approved bills in a bipartisan package that will create jobs and boost Michigan’s economy by attracting the film industry to our state with the most competitive film incentive package in the country.
“We want to make Michigan the number one destination for film producers,” said Sen. Jason Allen in a news release. Allen chairs the Senate Commerce and Tourism Committee and helped guide the legislation through a swift approval process. “These robust incentives will demonstrate that Michigan means business and wants to be a major player.”
The package received support from Michigan actor Jeff Daniels, author and Detroit Free Press Columnist Mitch Albom, Michigan film producers and other industry advocates.
Under the plan, Michigan filmmakers would enjoy an infrastructure tax credit which would be the best in the nation. Other tax incentives, loan programs and job training costs credits would make Michigan one of the most inexpensive states for production work. The incentive package also opens up state properties such as parks, buildings, roads and landmarks to be used with ease, cutting the red tape producers normally would have to go through to film in our state.
Allen added that the package covers more than Hollywood-type motion pictures and also includes things like commercials, TV shows, miniseries, video games and Internet programs.
“This investment makes sense,” Allen said. “The emerging digital media can become a major economic driver in our state. The incentives we hope to offer will attract filmmakers and reap tremendous dividends in the years to come.”
The legislation now goes to the House where Allen hopes for swift passage.

NEW SCENIC HERITAGE ROUTE
ON OLD MISSION PENINSULA
Old Mission Peninsula is Michigan’s newest heritage route, with a celebration planned for Saturday, May 17.
The 18-mile-long corridor of M-37, also known as the Old Mission Peninsula or Center Road, has received official designation from MDOT as a “scenic heritage route,“ one of only five in Michigan. There is a total of 15 designated heritage routes (each designated scenic, historic, or recreational) statewide.
“This new designation will help preserve and improve the scenic, agricultural, and rural qualities of this unique northwest Michigan corridor,” said Pete Hanses, manager of MDOT’s Heritage Route Program.
He added that local residents and township officials met more than a decade ago to discuss the preservation project, working with MDOT to make it a reality.
The public is invited to the dedication ceremony at 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 17, at Fire Station #2 on Center Road.



 
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