Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Tunnel Vision
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Tunnel Vision

Robert Downes - April 7th, 2008
Call it a party on wheels with world-class scenery. That’s the spin on the 19th Annual Zoo-De-Mackinac Bike Bash, which travels 51 miles along the famed “Tunnel of Trees” route north of Harbor Springs, to a night of celebration on Mackinac Island.
On May 17, more than 2,400 cyclists are expected for the bike tour, which heads north from Boyne Highlands and up the coast of Lake Michigan along US-119. The Tunnel of Trees route is draped with superlatives from travel writers the world over, not to mention carpets of trilliums and lilacs in bloom beneath its leafy bower. Riders continue on through the farmlands and forests of Wilderness State Park and finish with spectacular views of the Mackinac Bridge and a party in Mackinaw City.
But hold on, because the fun is just starting: the entry fee includes a round-trip ferry ride to Mackinac Island for more parties. In fact, the Zoo-De-Mack weekend is considered one of the biggest events of the season for the island’s taverns, hotels and restaurants.

It all started more than 20 years ago when Greg Drawbaugh and some friends from the Detroit area were up skiing at Boyne. “We decided to take a trip to the U.P. and we drove up US-119 to get there,” he recalls. “And I remember thinking, ‘Boy, this is a beautiful road -- it would make a great bike trip.’ So a few years later, the first mountain bikes came out on the market and we decided to make the ride.”
Drawbaugh, who lives in Grosse Pointe Park, was 25 when he, his brother Doug, and a few friends from the Detroit area completed the first tour in 1989.
“There were eight of us riders the first year and we had a great time,” he says. “The next year, we made up a little flyer and I think we had 88 people show up. One of the riders was Steve Kircher, whose family owned Boyne, and he encouraged us to keep the tour going. So the next year we had 250 riders, then 450 the year after that and it grew from there.”
Increasing numbers of cyclists and liability issues prompted the Drawbaughs to turn the tour into a business. Today, what started as a word-of-mouth event, has an elaborate website (www.zoo-de-mack.com) and has garnered a loyal following. It’s possible that more than 2,500 riders will participate this year, despite the tough economic climate.
“It’s a very laid-back event and it’s non-competitive for all ages,” says coordinator Sarah Gough. “You don’t have to be an avid cyclist -- just jump on your bike and do it.”

She notes that the tour includes perks like rest stops, sag wagon support and luggage transportation to Mackinac Island. Cyclists also enjoy a pre-ride party at the Zoo Bar at Boyne Highland on Friday night, lunch at Legs Inn in Cross Village on Saturday, and post-ride parties with live music at The Gatehouse (formerly The French Outpost), Pink Pony, and Horns on Mackinac Island.
Riders are transported to and from the island on the Arnold Ferry line, with special extended hours from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. “We take over the whole island and it’s the biggest night of the year at the bars,” Gough says. “The ferries run late because quite a few riders stay on the mainland where you can get a room for as little as $50.”
The tour also includes bike shuttles each way between Mackinaw City and Boyne Highlands. Riders can either park their vehicles in town and catch a shuttle to Boyne Highlands on Friday night, or catch the shuttle back on Sunday. Some elect to cycle the route in reverse.
What about rain?
“We’ve been pretty lucky, so far,” Drawbaugh says. “One year, we passed out garbage bags for the riders to wear, but we’ve never been rained out. Sometimes there are a few sprinkles along the route, but never a wash-out.”
He adds that cyclists may be cheered to learn that Zoo-De-Mackinac is bringing back the popular Biketoberfest this fall. The tour used to run out of Boyne Mountain, but was discontinued. “We’re going to relaunch it at Boyne Highlands in September.”

Online registration is underway for the Zoo-De-Mackinac Bike Bash, which will be held Saturday, May 17, starting at Boyne Highlands ski resort outside Harbor Springs. The tour is $50 ($60 after May 3), with online registration closing on May 12.
The entry fee includes the pre-ride party Friday night at the Zoo Bar at Boyne Highlands, luggage transportation to Mackinaw City on Saturday, lunch at the Legs Inn on Saturday, round-trip ferry transportation to and from Mackinac Island on Arnold Ferry and post-ride parties on Saturday night. For details and to register, see www.zoo-de-mack.com.

Roll ’Em:
A few other bike tours you won’t want to miss this summer. Please note, affordable early entry fees in the $25 range rise steeply for those who don’t register early...
•The Michigander Bike Tour, which has options ranging from two-to-seven days along the coast of Lake Michigan from Muskegon to Traverse City, beginning July 12. See www.michigantrails.org for details.
• The Ride Around Torch (RAT) on Sunday, July 20. The ride departs from Elk Rapids and runs 62 miles around Torch Lake, with alternative 25-mile and 100-mile routes. See www.cherrycapitalcyclingclub.org for details.
• The Tour de TART on Aug. 8, is a one-way 18-mile ride to Suttons Bay from Traverse City along the Leelanau Trail, with a picnic party at the end of the ride. The entry fee of $25 benefits the TART Trail system. See www.traversetrails.com
• The Leelanau Harvest Tour takes place Sept. 21 on a rolling course around Leelanau County. See www.cherrycapitalcyclingclub.org
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