Letters

Letters 04-14-14

Benishek Inching

Regarding “Benishek No Environmentalist” I agree with Mr. Powell’s letter to the editor/ opinion of Congressman Dan Benishek’s poor environmental record and his penchant for putting corporate interests ahead of his constituents’...

Climate Change Warning

Currently there are three assaults on climate change. The first is on the integrity of the scientists who support human activity in climate change. Second is that humans are not capable of affecting the climate...

Fed Up About Roads

It has gotten to the point where I cringe when I have to drive around this area. There are areas in Traverse City that look like a war zone. When you have to spend more time viewing potholes instead on concentrating on the road, accidents are bound to happen...

Don’t Blame the IRS

I have not heard much about the reason for the IRS getting itself entangled with the scrutiny of certain conservative 501(c) groups (not for profit) seeking tax exemption. Groups seeking tax relief must be organizations that are operated “primarily for the purpose of bringing about civic betterment and social improvements.”


Home · Articles · News · Features · Going with the flow
. . . .

Going with the flow

Robert Downes - April 7th, 2008
Wondering where to paddle that new kayak this summer? In Northern Michigan, your biggest problem will be trying to choose from among the many spectacular rivers.
Here’s a rundown on some of our favorite rivers in the region, based on hours of exploring fun. Needless to say, there are many others worth exploring: the Platte, the Bear, the Fox and the Grass rivers all come to mind. But these will get you started:

The Betsie River -- Benzie County

The Betsie is noteworthy as a wildlife river: chances are good that you’ll see deer along the route, and certainly many birds and wild flowers.
There’s a place to put in on the Betsie at the bridge just down the hill on River Road to the west of Benzonia. You can spot your car about three miles downstream at a parking lot where the river crosses another bridge. It’s a short enough stretch by road that you can pedal a bike back to the launching area.
If you wish, you can paddle farther on to Elberta; but be forewarned: hefty kayakers may get stuck in the shallow mud flats just before the harbor... Bonus: a side-trip to Gwen Frostics fabulous print shop on River Road.

The Boardman River -- Grand
Traverse County

There are two great options for paddling the Boardman, which is the river that literally “built” Traverse City back in the lumber era when saw logs were floated downstream to the town’s lumber mills.
Option one: Jump off from Ranch Rudolf, located 12 miles southeast of Traverse City. The rustic resort offers canoe trips, with put-ins available upstream where the river is at its wildest and most scenic.
Option two: Put in at the Keystone Road parking lot on the Boardman near Chum’s Corners in TC. Be sure to wear a helmet and have your wits about you, because heavy rapids and dangerous rocks lie just 100 yards downstream. Beyond that, however, its smooth paddling all the way across Boardman Lake to downtown Traverse City and West Bay. Be prepared to portage around three dams, and possibly wade for a bit across one of the shallow sections just past the rapids. A shorter alternative is to put in at Sabin Dam.

The Crystal River -- Leelanau County

A jewel of a river and a fun option for friends and family who want to enjoy one of the many restaurants in Glen Arbor for an after-paddle get-together.
Take a right turn off M-22 on the road just north of Glen Arbor and follow the winding river about a mile to a put-in parking lot near a small dam.
The Crystal provides a beautiful, serpentine paddle back to the north end of town, with a good exit point being the landing across from the Shell station. Its shallow waters provide its shining “crystal” appellation (but may also necessitate some wading in spots). There are three short portages along the river, but you can bypass one of them by shooting a tunnel that provides a whooping slide under the roadway.

The Manistee River -- Wexford County

Opportunities for camping present themselves on the broad Manistee, which is Northern Michigan’s longest river. A good jump-off point is just south of the rest stop on US-131 (the former Chippewa Landing). Paddle west for fabulous views of the bluffs which tower for hundreds of feet along the north bank. There are designated campsites along the route, but some choose to simply pull in wherever looks good (although you run the risk of encountering teenage partyers who wander down the two-tracks to the river). A good place to exit the river is the parking lot on Summit City Road, southeast of Kingsley.

The Sturgeon River -- Cheboygan County

The Sturgeon is the fastest-flowing river in Northern Michigan, dropping an estimated 17 feet per mile. Put in at the park in Wolverine and hold onto your hat for a wild ride all the way to the town of Indian River.
Be sure to steer far clear of the many log jams along the river banks: kayakers, especially, can be swept into these traps and pinned underwater. And bring a change of clothes in a waterproof bag, because chances are good you’re in for a dunking. A more stable option is paddling the Sturgeon in a canoe.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close